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Emperor Vs. Gafur Daud Bohra - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCriminal
CourtMumbai
Decided On
Case NumberCriminal Appeal No. 508 of 1928
Judge
Reported in(1929)31BOMLR578
AppellantEmperor
RespondentGafur Daud Bohra
DispositionAppeal dismissed
Excerpt:
.....municipal act (bom. iii of 1901), sections 96, 113-dittrkt municipality-permission to build-private street-projection of eaves-requirement that eaves should project above a certain height-requirement not valid.;a district municipality cannot, under sections 96 and 113 of the bombay district municipal act 1901, require that eaves should be so constructed as to overhang a private street above a certain height. - maharashtra scheduled castes, scheduled tribes, de-notified tribes (vimukta jatis), nomadic tribes, other backward classes and special backward category (regulation of issuance and verification of) caste certificate act (23 of 2001), sections 6 & 10: [s.b. mhase, a.p. deshpande & p.b. varale, jj] caste certificate petitioner seeking appointment against the post reserved for..........in tribhovan v. ahmedabad municipality (1902) 5 bom. l.r. 48 and that whether the street is a private street or a public street the municipality has power to act under section 96 of the bombay district muuicipal act, 1901, according to the ruling in viramgam municipality v. bhaichand damodar (1919) 22 bom. l.r. 61. further, reliance is placed on the judgment of fawcefct j. in the case of ahmedabad municipality v. manilal (1920) 23 bom. l.r. 193 where it was held that section 113 of the municipal act did not restrict the general powers conferred on a municipality by section 96.2. it is conceded on behalf of the accused that section 96 would apply to balconies or eaves and other projections of a house which form part of a building and that notice is necessary under section 96, but it.....
Judgment:

Patkar, J.

1. It is urged in support of this appeal that balconies and eaves form part of a building according to the decision in Tribhovan v. Ahmedabad Municipality (1902) 5 Bom. L.R. 48 and that whether the street is a private street or a public street the Municipality has power to act under Section 96 of the Bombay District Muuicipal Act, 1901, according to the ruling in Viramgam Municipality v. Bhaichand Damodar (1919) 22 Bom. L.R. 61. Further, reliance is placed on the judgment of Fawcefct J. in the case of Ahmedabad Municipality v. Manilal (1920) 23 Bom. L.R. 193 where it was held that Section 113 of the Municipal Act did not restrict the general powers conferred on a Municipality by Section 96.

2. It is conceded on behalf of the accused that Section 96 would apply to balconies or eaves and other projections of a house which form part of a building and that notice is necessary under Section 96, but it is argued on behalf of the accused that the order passed by the Municipality prescribing the height at which the eaves should be erected is not legal as it does not fall within Clause (2) of Section 96. In Viramgam Municipality v. Bhaichand Damodar (1919) 22 Bom. L.R. 61 it was held that if an otla was constructed without permission under Section 96 of the Bombay District Municipal Act, 1901, the Municipality could remove it even if it was on a private street land. In the present case the accused gave notice under Section 96 of Bombay Act III of 1901. The only question is whether the order of the Municipality fixing the height of the eaves at twelve feet is a legal order. The case of Ahmedabad Municipality v. Manilal (1920) 23 Bom. L.R. 193 relates to a balcony (Dakhli) to the second storey of a house abutting on a public street and projecting to a greater extent than that prescribed by the permission given by the Municipality under Section 33 of the Bombay Act VI of 1873. In the present case the eaves do not project beyond the limit fixed by the permission granted under Section 96 of Act HI of 1901, but are built at a lower level than that prescribed by the permission granted under Section 96 of Bombay Act III of 1901, and that the building abuts on a private street and not a public street. The case of Tribhovan v. Ahmedabad Municipality (1920) 5 Bom. L.R. 48 relates to a balcony put by a person to his house abutting on a private street and constructed in defiance of the orders issued by the Municipality under Section 33 of Bombay Act VI of 1873. The wording, however, of Section 33 of Bombay Act VI of 1873 is very wide. Under Section 33, Clause (2), of Bombay Act VI of 1873, the Municipality had power within one month from receiving the notice to issue such orders not inconsistent with the Act as they may think proper with reference to such building. Clause (2) of Section 96 of the present Act is restrictive in its terms. Under that clause the Municipality have power to issue orders not inconsistent with the Act and (1) may give permission to erect or alter or add to the building according to the plan and information furnished; or (2) may impose in writing such conditions as to level, drainage, sanitation, materials, or to dimensions and cubical contents of rooms, doors, windows and apertures for ventilation, or with reference to the location of the building in relation to any street existing or projected, as they think proper; or (3) may direct that the work shall not be proceeded with unless and until all questions connected with the respective location of the building and any such street have been decided to their satisfaction. It does not appear in this ease that the height at which the eaves were to be erected was mentioned in the plan or in the information furnished. It is suggested in support of this appeal that by the application discretion was entrusted to the Municipality to prescribe the height, and that the report of the Secretary and the permission fixed the height at twelve feet. It does not appear that the accused left the matter to the discretion of the Municipality, nor does it appear that in the plan or in the information furnished the height was mentioned to be twelve feet. It is not suggested that the Municipality entered in the plan the height at which the eaves were to be built. It would, therefore, follow that the Municipality had no right to insist on having the eaves built at the height of twelve feet unless it was so mentioned in the plan or in the information furnished. The regulation of the height at which eaves should be erected does not fall within the wording of the second part of this clause, for the second part is restricted to level, drainage, sanitation, material or to the dimensions and cubical contents of rooms, doors, windows and apertures for ventilation or with reference to the location of the building and does not refer to the height at which eaves have to be erected. It is conceded that the order of the Municipality does not fall under the second part of this clause. Assuming, therefore, that Section 113 does not control the wide wording of Section 90, we think that the second clause of Section 96 does not empower the Municipality to prescribe the height at which eayes should be erected. Under Section 118 power is given to the Municipality to prescribe the height at which the roofs or eaves may be erected, but such projections must, according to that section, be over public streets. It is found in the present case that the street on which the eaves project is a private street and we accept the finding of the lower Court that the street is a private street and not a public street. 'It would, therefore, follow that Section 113, which empowers the Municipality to regulate the height of the eaves, does not apply to the eaves of the house in the present case as it abuts on a private street.

3. We think, therefore, that the orders of the Municipality are not legal in prescribing the height of the eavea at twelve feet, We would, therefore, confirm the order of acquittal of the lower Court and dismiss this appeal.

Baker, J.

4. I agree.


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