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Ratiram Pundlik Khedkar Vs. Pundlik Arjun Khedkar - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectProperty;Criminal
CourtMumbai High Court
Decided On
Case NumberCivil Revn. Appln. No. 677 of 1979
Judge
Reported inAIR1982Bom79
ActsCode of Civil Procedure (CPC) (Amendment) Act, 1960 - Sections 94 - Order 39, Rules 1 and 2; Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC) , 1973 - Sections 145
AppellantRatiram Pundlik Khedkar
RespondentPundlik Arjun Khedkar
Appellant AdvocateR.N. Deshpande, Adv.
Respondent AdvocateM.S. Deshpande, Adv.
Excerpt:
the case debated on the application filed for the grant of temporary injunction under section 94 of the civil procedure code, 1908 - during the pendency of proceedings under section 145 of the criminal procedure code, a suit for perpetual injunction to restrain the defendant from disturbing the possession of the plaintiff over the suit lands was filed - after institution of the suit, a kararnama was executed in favour of the defendant and the possession of the defendant was acknowledged by the plaintiff - under section 145 of the criminal procedure code, the magistrate held the defendant to be in possession of the disputed land - it was held that the application for the temporary injunction filed thereafter could not be allowed - hence, the order of magistrate under section 145 of the..........for the years 1976-77 and 1977-78 showed that it was the plaintiff who was in possession of the suit property, though in the year 1978-79 the possession of the defendant no. 1 came to be shown. he referred me to one notice dt/. 10-5-1979 (ex. 20/1) which was issued by the defendant no. 1 to the plaintiff just a month or so before the suit where in the defendant no. 1 had stated that the plaintiff and his wife were not on talking terms and were residing separately, about which he was extremely sorry and be requested both the plaintiff and his wife to come and reside together. he therefore, submitted that no weight could be attached to the affidavit of ex. 56 of the wife of the plaintiff relied upon by the defendant no, 1 he further submitted that the grant or refusal of injunction was.....
Judgment:
ORDER

1. This revision application is filed by the original defendant No. I against an order passed by the Extra Assistant Judge, Akola allowing the application of the plaintiff (non-applicant) for temporary injunction. The trial Court had rejected the application of the plaintiff for temporary injunction, but in the appeal the order was set aside and the learned Extra Assistant Judge having allowed the same, the original defendant No. 1 preferred the present revision application.

2. The defendant No. I is the adopted son of the plaintiff. Admittedly the plaintiff was the owner of the suit fields and be filed the suit only for perpetual injunction praying that the defendant No. I should not disturb his possession over the suit fields, which he tried to do a few days prior to the filing of the suit with the help of some persons.

3. The plaintiff filed an application for temporary injunction and an ex parts temporary injunction and was granted by the trial Court. When the defendant No. I put in appearance in response to the show cause notice, he stated that he was the adopted son of the plaintiff by virtue of the registered adoption dated 1-1-1971. The plaintiff was old and infirm and suffered from gangrenes and as he was unable to manage the property, the management and cultivation was entrusted to him and he was in actual possession of the same. His name was also entered into the Record of rights after notice to the plaintiff and that his possession for the year 1978-79 is also shown in the crop-statement. He further stated that the plaintiff was disputing the adoption deed at the instance of his nephews and was trying to disturb his possession. He, therefore, prayed for vacation of the order of temporary injunction passed exparte against him, since he was himself in possession of the property to the exclusion of the plaintiff on the date of the suit.

4. As stated earlier, the trial Court after hearing both the parities vacated the temporary injunction order which was issued earlier, but in appeal the learned Extra Assistant Judge allowed the same and hence this revision application by original defendant No. I.

5. Shri. R. N. Deshpande, the learned counsel for the applicant, submitted that prior to the filing of the present suit on 25-6-1979 proceedings under S. 145 of the Code of Criminal Procedure were commenced on 20-5-1079 and the learned Sub Divisional Magistrate had passed orders on 3-9-1979 upholding the possession of the defendant No. I and directing the plaintiff not to disturb his possession. He further submitted that even after the institution of the suit on 25-6-1979 the plaintiff himself had executed a Karanama, of an agreement, on 3-7-1979. Whereby the requested the defendant No, 1 to execute sale deed in respect of 5 acres in favour of each of his two nephews. He submitted that this Karanama was wrongly read by the learned appellate Judge when the recitals contained an admission of the plaintiff that the defendant no. I was the full owner in the management of the property.

6. It was further submitted by Shri R. N. Deshpande, that the defendant No. I had filed an affidavit at Ex. 36 of the wife of the plaintiff himself in which the had admitted the fact of possession of the defendant No. 1. The other evidence that was relied upon in the Courts below and also relied upon in this revision are the affidavits of jiwansing, Balwant and Dharmarao (Exts. 43 to 45) stating that they had received amounts from the defendant No. 1 for performing the summer operations of this land. Mr. R. N. Deshpande further submitted that even assuring that the defendant No. I was only in joint possession of the suit fields, as observed by the learned Appellate Court, then a writ of temporary injunction could not be issued against him restraining him from entering upon the suit fields.

7. Mr. M. S. Deshpande, the learned counsel for the non-applicant (plaintiff), on the other hand, submitted that the crop-statements for the years 1976-77 and 1977-78 showed that it was the plaintiff who was in possession of the suit property, though in the year 1978-79 the possession of the defendant No. 1 came to be shown. He referred me to one notice dt/. 10-5-1979 (Ex. 20/1) which was issued by the defendant No. 1 to the plaintiff just a month or so before the suit where in the defendant No. 1 had stated that the plaintiff and his wife were not on talking terms and were residing separately, about which he was extremely sorry and be requested both the plaintiff and his wife to come and reside together. He therefore, submitted that no weight could be attached to the affidavit of Ex. 56 of the wife of the plaintiff relied upon by the defendant No, 1 He further submitted that the grant or refusal of injunction was a discretionary relief and it should not be lightly interfered with by the Court in its revisional jurisdiction.

8. Mr. M. S. Deshpande relied upon Manickvachakam Chettial v. Official Receiver, East Tanjore, Nagapatam AIR 1939 Mad 733 which lays down that if the lower Court wrongly decided the question as to burden of proof it was no ground for interference in revision. In Mt. Bibi Ratiquan v. Gopi Mohron : AIR1953Pat399 what was observed was that then justice has been done between the parties and no prejudice to their respective claims has occurred, the High Court would not interfere. Further in Naik Brindhavanrai v. Churamani Thapa Air 1969 Man 29 it was observed that interference under S. 115 of the C. P. C. Is not to be made in an order based on appreciation of evidence and lastly in Manohar Lal Chopra v. Rai Bahadur Rro Raja Seth Hiralal, : AIR1962SC527 which was relied upon, f was observed that temporary injunction could be granted under inherent jurisdiction by a Court.

9. On the other hand, Mr. R. N. Deshpande referred the to Naindeo v. Digambar 1977 Mah LJ 82in support of his proposition that the evidence rendered by the parties cannot be ignored and it it is ignored on unsustainable grounds. It would be an error of jurisdiction entitling the High Court to interfere.

10. Now, in the first place, 1 find that an application for temporary injunction in a suit for perpetual injunction in a suit for perpetual injunction proceeds on an assumption that the plaintiff on the date of the suit and on the date of making of such an application is in actual possession of the property and that his peaceful possession is being threatened. If the plaintiff is not in possession then the suit for perpetual injunction simplicity in fact would be untenable and if in such a situation if he applies for temporary injunction not being in possession and if the Courts were in grant such and if the Courts were to grant such a relief, there is every possibly that such an order obtained by an ingenious and crafty plaintiff on suppression of true facts is likely to be used not as a shield to preserve and protect his possession, but verity as a warrant of possession against which the Courts issuing all order of injunction must guard themselves.

11. The prima facie case for the plaintiff, therefore lies in pointing out satisfactory evidence that the possession (and not title) is with him, Even assuming that on the date of the suit the possession was with the plaintiff, but on the day on which he moves the Court for temporary injunction his possession is lost, then not only the application of temporary injunction (which is founded on the fact that the plaintiff is in actual possession) it untenable, but even the suit itself simplicity for perpetual injunction would be had.

12. The learned appellate Judge in the instant case tried in vain to address himself to the question of title and to the provisions 1982 Bom./6 III of S. 12(c) of the Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act. Even assuming that the defendant No. 1 is the adopted son of the plaintiff and did not and could not divest the adoptive father of his title. If it is established that the plaintiff had put him in possession of the management of the property on his behalf. The remedy of the plaintiff lay in filing a proper suit for possession of fide and not a pare suit for perpetual injunction in this view of the matter, the following observations of the lower appellants Courts seem wholly it relevant:

'Thus defendant No. 1 being the adopted son, the plaintiff expressed his desire that the defendant should thereafter look after the management of the property of the plaintiff. Does it thereby mean that the plaintiff has surrendered all his interest in the property and exclusively given the center property in such kind of possession of the defendant No. 1 and that no interest of the plaintiff was retained with the plaintiff to the suit property? I do not think that it was such an intention of the parties. I Simply means that the plaintiff became old and was not in a position to physically supervise the cultivation of the suit property. Seeing that the defendant No. 1 is living with his probably it appeared to him that it would be better f the management is entrusted to defendant No. 1 It does not mean that the possession of the plaintiff is lost. Such a possession of the defendant No, 1 would not amount is his posssession exclusively and separate from the plaintiff only if it is supported with some title'.

13. So far as the finding of the Criminal Court in the proceedings under S. 145 of the Cr. P. C. Is concerned, the learned Extra Assistant Judge again tried in vain to distinguish the case, namely, Visan Narayan Gedam v. Madhukar 1965 Mah LJ 70. In that case the order of the Magistrate holding the defendant to be in possession was passed prior to the filing of the suit, in the instant case the suit was filed on 25-5-1979. And the order in the proceedings under S. 145 of the Cr. P. C. Came to be passed about 3 months thereafter that is on 3-9-1979 which in fact ought to relate to the date when the proceedings under S. 145 were commence, that is, on 20-5-0979 when the order in those proceedings was passed, was in fact not every material. That was at any state a relevant and material plssed, was in fact not very material. That was at any rate a relevant and material piece or evidence which negatived the prima facie case of the plaintiff that he was in possession of the suit property. As stated earlier, even if it is shown that after the filing of the suit for perpetual injunction, the plaintiff lost possession during the pendent of the suit, an application for temporary injunction could not be allowed in the teeth of the fact that the plaintiff is not in possession when the made such an application. In fact, as observed in Aher mesa Hamir v. Charan Shamla Sure (1973) 14 Guj LR 912 when the Magistrate under S. 145 Cr, P. C. Orders handing over possession that right would come to an end only on passing of a decree or order for eviction in due course of law, but so long as that right exists, no injunction order could be issued, since the order under Section 145, Cr. P. C. Protects eviction from the date of the order and that the remedy of the aggrieved party is either to get it cancelled by way or revision or by filing a suit, but a suit only for temporary injunction without claiming relief of possession would be misconceived. The said order passed by the Magistrate under S. 145, Cr. P. C. Would also be binding on the plaintiff unless it is set aside under Explanation VIII to Section 11 of the C. P. C. As amended.

14. The Kararnama dt. 3-7-1979. Executed by the plaintiff in favour of the defendant No. 1 after filing of the suit was in fact misread by the learned Extra Assistant Judge The plaintiff in fact by executing the said Kararnama virtually recognised the defendant No. 1 as a full owner in actual possession and management of the suit property. This document containing the admission of the plaintiff as regards the fact of possession was duly proved by the defendant No. by filing the affidavits of its scribe Sonaji (Ex. 41) and of the two attesting witness Bhimral (Exhibit 42) and Ajabrao (Ex. 41).

15. The order passed by the Extra assistant Judge setting aside the order of the trial Court has, therefore, to be set aside since the Assistant Judge without considering the question a to whether the plaintiff was in fact in actual possession of the property or not was influenced more by the fact that he was the holder of the title and the he must be deemed to be in joint possession along with his adopted son as the member of the joint Hindu family, which in fact that he was the holder of the title and that be most be deemed to be in joint possession along with his adopted son as the member of the joint Hindu family, which in fact was never the case made out by the plaintiff in applying for temporary injunction. The order being based upon wrong appreciation of the evidence and the circumstances of the case and on wrong approach to issue to question has to be set aside under S. 113 of the C. P. C. On the ground of error of jurisdiction.

16. In the result, the revision application is allowed and the impugned order passed by the learned Extra Assistant Judge is set aside and the order passed by the trial Judge has to be restores. The application of the plaintiff (non-applicant) for temporary injunction stands dismissed. In the circumstances of the case there will be no order as to costs.

17. Revision allowed.


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