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Ramji Ghayaji Vs. Chandrakant Chintaman and ors. - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectInsurance;Motor Vehicles
CourtMumbai High Court
Decided On
Judge
Reported in1(1985)ACC502
AppellantRamji Ghayaji
RespondentChandrakant Chintaman and ors.
Excerpt:
.....like the judgment delivered by the original court (ex. the impact on the car clearly shows that the front portion of the car was involved. the picture brought out by these facts clearly shows that it just have been the car which hit the cycle on that the road and that too from the front side. 4. turning to the quantum of compensation, the evidence of ramji chavan (pw 1), who is the father of the deceased bansilal, chhaganlal jasaraj (pw2)and rahim shakur (pw 3) clearly goes to show that the deceased bansilal, who was the second eldest son of ramji chavan, was a motor mechanic. now, that appears to be clearly erroneous'.the evidence of rahim shakur (pw 3), who himself is a motor mechanic, shows that he has four servants and he used to pay rs. that much position is clearly..........of ramji chavan (pw 1), who is the father of the deceased bansilal, chhaganlal jasaraj (pw2)and rahim shakur (pw 3) clearly goes to show that the deceased bansilal, who was the second eldest son of ramji chavan, was a motor mechanic. he was trained in that regard and was in a position to earn as such. they evidence with regard to his employment by rahim shakur is not that satisfactory, for in the application itself it is stated that the deceased bansilal was in search of employment while the evidence is tendered of both chhaganlal jasaraj and rahim shakur so as to indicate that the deceased bansilal was actually employed. the evidence thus is not satisfactory, but one thing is clear that the deceased bansilal was knowing mechanism and could have been gainfully employed as a mechanic.....
Judgment:

Masodkar, J.

1. This is the original plaintiff's appeal arising out of the compensation suit which was partly decreed by the trial Court. In the original suit, the claim was to the tune of Rs. 20,000/-. In the appeal, the same is for Rs. 17,500/-. The compensation is sought by the appellant-plaintiff who, admittedly, is the natural father of the deceased Bansilal. Bansilal met with his death in a car accident that occurred on January 15, 1968 at about 6-45 p.m. The deceased Bansilal appears to be of 18 years of age at the time of his death. While he was driving a cycle, he was dashed by Car. No. BMF 7164 in from of the gate of Alta Company at Khopoli. The car involved in the accident belonged to defendant No. 1 and was insured as such. The driver of the car by name Ganpat was also prosecuted and was convicted. It is no more in dispute that Bansilal died as a result of the injuries on January 16, 1968.

2. Having held that the accident occurred due to negligent driving the trial Court recorded the finding that the deceased Bansilal would have given Rs. 15/- per month to his father, i.e., the present appellant-plaintiff, and on that basis the appellant-plaintiff was held to be entitled to a sum of Rs. 2,500/-. That holding is in question in the present appeal.

3. As far as the accidental and natural death of Bansilal is concerned, the record does not admit any doubt. The aspect that the accident occurred due to the negligent driving of driver Ganpat rests entirely on the facts spoken to by the documents, like the judgment delivered by the Original Court (Ex. 60) and the Panchanama (Ex, 73). The Panch, Balwantsingh Dhansingh (PW 5), testified to the making of the Panchanama. Furthermore, there is an admission that the driver was convicted for the offence under Section 304-A of the Indian Penal Code. The Panchanama at Ex. 73 goes to show that as the Panchanama examined the spot and the vehicles, they found that the car BMF 7164 was having its face towards north and was on the tar road. The road itself is 20ft and on both sides there are 5' kutcha roads. They further found blood-stains towards the west at a distance of 1'-6' on the road. That spot was at a distance of 4' from the northern border of the road and 16' from the southern border. The impact on the car clearly shows that the front portion of the car was involved. The cycle was lying at a distance of 30' from the left side wheel of the car and on the other side was lying the injured. The picture brought out by these facts clearly shows that it just have been the car which hit the cycle on that the road and that too from the front side. There is no other evidence to indicate the cycle was not visible to the driver who was driving the car. The time was also such when the visibility should be clear. Under such circumstances, it has to be concluded that the accident must have occurred due to the negligent driving by driver Ganpat.

4. Turning to the quantum of compensation, the evidence of Ramji Chavan (PW 1), who is the father of the deceased Bansilal, Chhaganlal Jasaraj (PW2)and Rahim Shakur (PW 3) clearly goes to show that the deceased Bansilal, who was the second eldest son of Ramji Chavan, was a motor mechanic. He was trained in that regard and was in a position to earn as such. They evidence with regard to his employment by Rahim Shakur is not that satisfactory, for in the application itself it is stated that the deceased Bansilal was in search of employment while the evidence is tendered of both Chhaganlal Jasaraj and Rahim Shakur so as to indicate that the deceased Bansilal was actually employed. The evidence thus is not satisfactory, but one thing is clear that the deceased Bansilal was knowing mechanism and could have been gainfully employed as a mechanic in a motor garage.

5. The trial Court has having accepted the fact of training held that the earning of such a mechanic would be Rs. 75/- per month and the maximum that he would have spared for his father could not be more than Rs. 15/- per month. Now, that appears to be clearly erroneous'. The evidence of Rahim Shakur (PW 3), who himself is a Motor Mechanic, shows that he has four servants and he used to pay Rs. 250/- per month to the deceased Bansilal after September, 1967. The testimony of Chhaganlal Jasaraj (PW 2) shows that the earning of the deceased Bansilal was Rs. 250/- and was raised to Rs. 300/- per month. Rahim Shakur's testimony further goes to show that one of his employee was paid Rs. 180/- per month. The accident itself occurred in 1968. A trained motor mechanic would easily get anything between Rs. 200/- and Rs. 300/- per month. That much position is clearly inferable from the testimony of Chhaganlal Jasaraj and Rahim Shakur, though the fact of employment of the deceased Bansilal by Rahim Shakur may be of doubtful nature.

6. The ordinary earnings of the deceased Bansilal would, therefore, be between Rs. 200/- and Rs. 300/- per month and not Rs. 75/- per month as in held by the trial Court. There is no reason to hold that out of this earnings the deceased Bansilal would not support his family, particularly his father during the period would have been alive. He could easily pay Rs. 50/- per month to his father which amount the father and his family now stand deprived of. The compensation should have been worked out on the basis that the deceased Bansilal would have been in a position to pay a sum of Rs. 50/- per month to his father's family. Taking that as the basis, he would be paying Rs. 600/- per year and over the period of 20 years, as is calculated by the trial Court, the loss works out to Rs. 12,000/-. Leaving the margin of Rs. 2,000/, the compensation would reasonably work out to Rs. 10,000/-. This is more so when the deceased Bansilal, admittedly, was a motor mechanic and had the potentiality of earning more and more and was in prime of youth.

7. Taking all the factors into account, the award of Rs. 2,500/- as is made by the trial Court is highly inadequate. The same is set aside and instead it is adjudged that the appellant-plaintiff would be entitled to a sum of Rs. 10,000/- payable by the defendants towards the compensation. If this amount is paid within one month, there would be no order as to interest. Upon failure to pay this amount within one month, this amount will carry interest at the rate of 10% per annum. There would be decree in these terms in the present appeal. To the extent above, the appeal is allowed with costs. A copy of this judgment be sent to the collector for recovery of Court fees.


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