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Tippa Reddy Vs. Gondamma - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCriminal
CourtAndhra Pradesh High Court
Decided On
Judge
Reported in1952CriLJ567
AppellantTippa Reddy
RespondentGondamma
Excerpt:
.....of rs.4,15,150/- awarded by the tribunal was enhanced to rs.8,20,000/-. - aliuddin ansari refers to the words of sub-section (5) namely, that when the court is satisfied that no dispute exists the magistrate shall stay further proceedings and cancel his order passed under section 145, clause (1), i. it is well settled that when an order under sub-section (5) is passed, it is passed on the assumption that in the absence of dispute the criminal court bas ceased to exercise its jurisdiction. the said sub-section protects the initial order passed by the magistrate under sub-section (1) to this extent that because of the fact that subsequently parties came to a compromise and satisfied the court that no dispute existed, the initial order of the magistrate exercising jurisdiction..........sub-section protects the initial order passed by the magistrate under sub-section (1) to this extent that because of the fact that subsequently parties came to a compromise and satisfied the court that no dispute existed, the initial order of the magistrate exercising jurisdiction should not be called in question. but passing of an order under sub-section (5) is tantamount to the fact that there is no further ground for exercising criminal jurisdiction of the court. when that is the position the present petition by gondamma cannot be entertained by the magistrate as he has ceased to exercise any criminal jurisdiction in the matter, it is clear that in the absence of any criminal jurisdiction, the question of exercising inherent rights under section 561(a) does not arise. i,.....
Judgment:
ORDER

Shripatrao, J.

1. This is a revision petition against the order of the Munsiff at Chincholi, dated 4.7.1951.

2. The facts necessary in the revision are that Gondamma, respondent before me filed a petition in the lower Court stating that there was a dispute between the parties under Section 148H Criminal P.C. corresponding to Section 145, Criminal P.C., which was decided on 24th Isfandar 1350 F. (1941 AD) on the basis of a compromise; that as mentioned in the compromise the case was decided by the criminal Court on the said date and that subsequently she got possession of survey number 163. She alleges that she was in possession and enjoyment of that survey number for some time, that) during the Police Action (which took place in 1948) the opposite party Tippa Reddy dispossessed her and that therefore she should be given possession. The present petitioner contested the petition on the ground that the Magistrate had no jurisdiction to entertain the petition. The lower Court came to the conclusion that it had inherent powers under Section 581(A) Criminal P.C., to pass necessary orders.

3. The question to be decided is whether the Criminal Court has any jurisdiction under the circumstances narrated by the respondent Gondamma. Mr. Aliuddin Ansari, the learned Advocate for the respondent argues that the case which was decided in 1941 A.D. referred to above was decided under Section 145, Clause (5), Criminal P.C., that it should be considered to be still pending and that the present petition should be regarded as a prayer for carrying out the order passed in 1941 by the Magistrate. It is difficult to agree with his argument. Gondamma herself has stated in her petition that in consequence of the said criminal proceedings of 1941 possession was delivered to her, that she was in enjoyment of the land in question till the Police Action for about 6 or 7 years and that she was dispossessed during Police Action. Thus, it is clear that the question of executing the order passed by the Magistrate in 1941 does not arise. Mr. Aliuddin Ansari refers to the words of Sub-section (5) namely, that when the Court is satisfied that no dispute exists the Magistrate shall stay further proceedings and cancel his order passed under Section 145, Clause (1), I. Criminal P.C. It is well settled that when an order under Sub-section (5) is passed, it is passed on the assumption that in the absence of dispute the Criminal Court bas ceased to exercise its jurisdiction. The said Sub-section protects the initial order passed by the Magistrate under Sub-section (1) to this extent that because of the fact that subsequently parties came to a compromise and satisfied the Court that no dispute existed, the initial order of the Magistrate exercising jurisdiction should not be called in question. But passing of an order under Sub-section (5) is tantamount to the fact that there is no further ground for exercising criminal jurisdiction of the Court. When that is the position the present petition by Gondamma cannot be entertained by the Magistrate as he has ceased to exercise any criminal jurisdiction in the matter, it Is clear that in the absence of any criminal jurisdiction, the question of exercising inherent rights under Section 561(A) does not arise. I, therefore, set aside the order of the lower Court and dismiss the petition of Gondamma filed by her on 27.2.1951. She may have recourse to such legal remedy as is warranted by law. Parties to bear their own costs at this revision.


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