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Rajendra Nath Tewari Vs. Board of Revenue, U.P. at Allahabad and ors. - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCivil
CourtAllahabad High Court
Decided On
Case NumberCivil Misc. Writ No. 2136 of 1970
Judge
Reported inAIR1972All417
ActsUttar Pradesh Zamindari Abolition and Land Reforms Rules, 1952
AppellantRajendra Nath Tewari
RespondentBoard of Revenue, U.P. at Allahabad and ors.
Appellant AdvocateR.S. Singh and ;G.C. Dwivedi, Advs.
Respondent AdvocateStanding Counsel
DispositionPetition allowed
Excerpt:
.....- execution - appendix iii, item 53 of u.p. zamindari abolition and land reforms rules, 1952 - the final decree is the decree passed by the court of last instance- whether such decree confirms, modifies or reverses the decree of trial court - period of limitation of one year to be computed from date of such decree. - - but when it affirms and adopts the mandatory part of the first court's decree, that decree may be, and should be referred to and the mandatory part of it so affirmed should be executed as though it were the decree of the appellate court'.these authorities clearly establish that when appeals have been carried from the decree of the trial court then the only executable decree is the decree of the final court the board of revenue has taken the view that since the second..........the execution of any decree other than a money decree. the limitation starts from the date of the final decree in the case. according to the petitioner the final decree in the case was the decree in second appeal passed by the board of revenue. if this is correct then the application for executionwas filed within the time of one year from the date of the decree of the board of revenue. the contention of learned counsel for respondent no. 4 is that where the decree of the trial court has only been affirmed by the appellate or the second appellate court then the final decree is the decree of the trial court and the application for execution must be filed within one year from the date of the decree of that court. a full bench of this court in shohrat singh. v. bridgman. (1882) ilr 4 all.....
Judgment:
ORDER

G.C. Mathur, J.

1. The petitioner filed a suit under Section 202 of the U. P. Zamindari Abolition and Land Reforms Act against respondent No 4. This suit was decreed by the trial court on June 13. 1960. An appeal filed against the decree of the trial court was dismissed by the first appellate court on September 13. 1960. A second appeal filed by respondent No. 4 was dismissed by the Board of Revenue under Order XLI. Rule 11, Civil P. C. on April 11. 1961. Thereafter on March 13, 1962 the petitioner filed an application for execution of the decree. The executing court dismissed the application as time barred. An appeal against the judgment and order of the executing court was dismissed by the Additional Commissioner and a second appeal was dismissed by the Board of Revenue, Hence this writ petition.

2. The limitation for execution of such a decree is provided for in Item 53 of Appendix III to the U. P. Zamindari Abolition and Land Reforms Rules, 1952. This item provides a period of limitation of one year for the execution of any decree other than a money decree. The limitation starts from the date of the final decree in the case. According to the petitioner the final decree in the case was the decree in second appeal passed by the Board of Revenue. If this is correct then the application for executionwas filed within the time of one year from the date of the decree of the Board of Revenue. The contention of learned counsel for respondent No. 4 is that where the decree of the trial court has only been affirmed by the appellate or the second appellate court then the final decree is the decree of the trial court and the application for execution must be filed within one year from the date of the decree of that court. A Full Bench of this court in Shohrat Singh. v. Bridgman. (1882) ILR 4 All 376 (FB) held that the decree of the court of last instance is the only decree susceptible of execution. It was observed in this case that the appellate decree is the final decree and the only decree capable of being executed after it has been passed, whether the same reverses, modifies, or confirms the decree of the Court from which the ap-peal was made.

The decision of the Full Bench was explained in Gobardhan Dass v. Gopal Ram. (1885) ILR 7 All 366, thus 'the effect is nothing more than that the last decree is to be regarded as the decree to be executed, whether it reverses, modifies or confirms; but when it affirms and adopts the mandatory part of the first court's decree, that decree may be, and should be referred to and the mandatory part of it so affirmed should be executed as though it were the decree of the appellate court'. These authorities clearly establish that when appeals have been carried from the decree of the trial court then the only executable decree is the decree of the final court The Board of Revenue has taken the view that since the second appeal in the present case was dismissed under Order XLI. Rule 11, the order passed therein did not amount to a decree. This is obviously incorrect. In Durga Singh v. Wahid Raza : AIR1965All226 , a Division Bench of this court held that the doctrine of merger applies even where a second appeal has been dismissed by the High Court summarily under Order XLI. Rule 11, Civil P. C. and that in such a case the High Court's decree is the final decree and the decree of the first appellate court merges with it. In this view it was the decree of the Board of Revenue passed in second appeal on April 11. 1961 which was the executable decree. The application for execution was filed within one year from the date of the decree and was therefore within time.

3. It was contended by learned counsel for respondent No. 4 that the decree of the trial court was a final decree and after it was passed it was capable of execution. He further urged that under Section 9 of the Limitation Act, 1963 time for execution started running from the date of the trial court decree and that there was no provisionfor arresting the running of limitation thereafter. That may be so, but since, in view of the authorities referred to above, the decree of the second appellate court was the only executable decree after the second appeal had been dismissed, the decree holder will have a fresh period of limitation from the date of the decree of the second appellate court. Some reliance was also placed upon the observations of the Supreme Court in State of Uttar Pradesh v. Mohd. Nooh AIR 1958 SC 86 to the effect that there was nothing in the Indian Law to warrant the suggestion that the decree or order of the court or tribunal of the first instance became final only on the termination of all proceedings by way of appeal or revision. These observations can help respondent No. 4 only to this extent that the decree of the trial court became executable as soon as it was passed but these observations can have no effect on the fresh right which the decree-holder gets to execute the decree after the passing of the decree by the second appellate court.

4. For the reasons stated above I am of opinion that the application for execution filed by the petitioners was not time barred. The judgments and orders of the courts below are manifestly erroneous. By taking an erroneous view on the question of limitation the courts below have failed to exercise the jurisdiction that was vested in them to execute the decree. The writ petition is accordingly allowed and the judgments and order of the Board of Revenue, the Additional Commissioner and the Executing Court are quashed. The Executing Court is direct to re-entertain the application for execution and to proceed in accordance with law. There will be no order as to costs.


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