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J.P. Ojha Vs. Firm R.R. Tandan and anr. - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCivil
CourtAllahabad High Court
Decided On
Case NumberCivil Revn. No. 920 of 1958
Judge
Reported inAIR1962All485
ActsCode of Civil Procedure (CPC) , 1908 - Sections 115 - Order 3, Rule 4 and 4(3)
AppellantJ.P. Ojha
RespondentFirm R.R. Tandan and anr.
Appellant AdvocateRadha Krishna, Adv.
Respondent AdvocateS.N. Kacker, Adv.
DispositionRevision allowed
Excerpt:
.....carries the right to file revision and also power of filing appeal bestows power to file revision.(ii) revision - section 115 order 3 rule 4 of code of civil procedure, 1908 - revision application not properly presented should be thrown out at the earlier stage - held, once filed and admitted cannot be adjudged as not properly filed subsequently. - - if the expression 'appellate jurisdiction' includes revisional jurisdiction then the word 'appeal' should be deemed to include the word 'revision'.having regard to the wide powers given in the vakalatnama, as well as the wider interpretation which should be placed upon the word 'appeal' used in order iii rule 4 (3), a revision should be deemed to be included in the last expression and a pleader having such powers as given in the..........aligarh, holding that the revision was not properly presented.2. the facts are that the plaintiff filed a suit in the court of the judge small cause court, aligarh, for recovery of rs. 1,000/-. the suit was partly decreed and thereafter a revision was filed by the same counsel who had filed the suit without filing a fresh vakalatnama. the counsel made a note on the petition of revision that his vakalatnama was already on record in the original suit. the learned judge passed an order that the revision was not properly presented because the vakalatnama filed in the lower court does not provide an 'express right' to the learned counsel to file a revision on behalf of the applicant and order iii rule 4 (3) does not confer such a right. this order passed by thelearned judge in this case and.....
Judgment:

Mithan Lal, J.

1. This civil revision filed by the plaintiff arises out of an order passed by the learned District Judge, Aligarh, holding that the revision was not properly presented.

2. The facts are that the plaintiff filed a suit in the court of the Judge Small Cause Court, Aligarh, for recovery of Rs. 1,000/-. The suit was partly decreed and thereafter a revision was filed by the same counsel who had filed the suit without filing a fresh vakalatnama. The counsel made a note on the petition of revision that his vakalatnama was already on record in the original suit. The learned Judge passed an order that the revision was not properly presented because the vakalatnama filed in the lower court does not provide an 'express right' to the learned counsel to file a revision on behalf of the applicant and Order III Rule 4 (3) does not confer such a right. This order passed by thelearned Judge in this case and several other cases, which are all fixed for hearing today, is totally erroneous.

3. It will appear from the vakalatnama filed in these cases that there is a clause permitting the lawyer to file an appeal, to make applications and to act on behalf of the client in all proceedings arising out of the suit. There are a number of other powers given in the vakalatnama. The view of the Judge appears to be that as the word 'revision' is not embodied as such in the vakalatnama the counsel is not authorised to file a revision. This view of the learned Judge appears to be too technical and in his own words there may not be any express right to the counsel to file a revision yet the right to file an appeal included a right to file a revision.

4. The powers of a pleader appointed in a Court are given in Order III Rule 4, C. P. C., which reads as follows :

''4(1) No pleader shall act for any person in any Court, unless he has been appointed for the purpose by Such person by a document in writing signed by such person or by his recognised agent or by some other person duly authorized by or under a power-of-attorney to make such appointment.

2. Every such appointment shall be filed in Court and shall be deemed to be in force until determined with the leave of the Court by a writing signed by the client or the pleader, as the case may be, and filed in Court, or until the client or the pleader dies; or until all proceedings in the suit are ended so far as regards the client.

3. For the purposes of Sub-rule (2) an application for review of judgment, an application under Section 144 or Section 152 of this Code, any appeal from any decree or order in the suit and any application, or act for the purpose of obtaining copies of documents or return of documents produced or filed in the suit or of obtaining refund of monies paid into the Court in connection with the suit shall be deeded to be proceedings in the suit.

4. The High court may, by general order, direct that, where the person by whom a pleader is appointed is unable to write his name, his mark upon the document appointing the pleader shall be attested by such person and in such manner as may be specified by the order.

5. No pleader who has been engaged for the purpose of pleading only shall plead on behalf of any party, unless he has filed in Court a memorandum of appearance signed by himself and stating:

(a) the names of the parties to the suit,

(b) the name of the party for whom he appears, and

(c) the name of the person by whom he is authorised to appear : Provided that nothing in this sub-rule shall apply to any pleader engaged to plead on behalf of any party by any other pleader who has been duly appointed to act in Court on behalf of such party.'

A particular reference may be made to Sub-rule (3) in which for purposes of Sub-rule (2) a pleader has been authorised to file ''any appeal from a decree or order in the suit and any application or act........'. The Code hasnot purposely used the word 'revision' and has used a wider term 'appeal' which would mean that in cases where the decree is appealable it would be an appeal for the purposes of Sub-rule (3), but in cases where only a revision lies against the decree or order it would be a revision. Moreover, the word 'revision' may also be included in the word 'application', in support of my view a reference may be made to the authority of Bhagwan Das v. Ganga Prasad, 1958 All LJ 702 : (AIR 1959 All 92) in-which Upadhya J. while interpreting the expression 'appellate jurisdiction' in Section 37 C. P. C. placed a wider meaning and held that this expression was comprehensive enough to include revisional jurisdiction. if the expression 'appellate jurisdiction' includes revisional jurisdiction then the word 'appeal' should be deemed to include the word 'revision'. Having regard to the wide powers given in the vakalatnama, as well as the wider interpretation which should be placed upon the word 'appeal' used in Order III Rule 4 (3), a revision should be deemed to be included in the last expression and a pleader having such powers as given in the vakalatnama, should be deemed to be authorised to file a revision as well.

5. There is another aspect of the matter. The revision was not thrown out as not properly presented on the date it was presented, but was thrown out after it had been admitted at the stage of the final bearing. If the learned Judge had any idea of throwing out the revision on this ground he should have done so at the earlier stage. Once the revision had been admitted, entertained and listed for final hearing the learned District judge could not take the view that the revision was not properly presented. The stage of presentation having been passed and the revision having been admitted the order is open to be questioned on this ground as well. The Full Bench authority of Om Prakash v. Moti Lal, 1958 All LJ 210 : (AIR 1958 All 409) though not directly on the point may be referred to in this behalf with advantage.

6. The order passed by the learned Judge, therefore must be set aside and the application in revision made before the District Judge must be deemed to be properly presented.

7. The revision is allowed. The order of the learned District Judge, Aligarh, is set aside and the revision is sent back with the direction that it shall be treated to be properly presented and thereafter it shall be dealt with according to law. Costs hereto shall abide the result.

8. Let the record of the case be sent backto the court below forthwith.


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