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Ramesh Chandra and anr. Vs. Hari Shankar and anr. - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectTenancy
CourtAllahabad High Court
Decided On
Case NumberSpecial Appeal No. 388 of 1975
Judge
Reported inAIR1976All557
ActsUttar Pradesh (Temporary) Control of Rent and Eviction Act, 1947 - Sections 7(2), 7A and 7F
AppellantRamesh Chandra and anr.
RespondentHari Shankar and anr.
Appellant AdvocateS.P. Gupta, Adv.
Respondent AdvocateK.C. Saxena, Adv. and ;Standing Counsel
DispositionAppeal dismissed
Excerpt:
- - provided that no order under this section shall be passed if the district magistrate is satisfied that there has been undue delay or it is otherwise inexpedient to do so. (4) no appeal shall lie from any order passed by the district magistrate under this section, but the commissioner may revise the said order, if he is satisfied that the district magistrate has acted illegally or with material irregularity or has wrongly refused to act and may make such order as he thinks fit. once this result is reached, the contention on behalf of the appellant must fail. this order, in view of the full bench decision wag an order under section 7 (2). the appellant has obviously in contravention of this order occupied the premises for the order cancelling his allotment amounted to an order..........state government enjoys under section 7-f, it could pass all orders which the commissioner or the district magistrate could pass. where the order cancels an allotment order and directs the release of an accommodation in favour of the landlord it is an order passed under sub-section (2) of section 7 and supersedes the order passed by the district magistrate under section 7 (2). such an order, according to the full bench, wasan order under section 7 (2) within the meaning of section 7-a (1) of the act. in the present case, all that the state government has done is to cancel the allotment order. no order of release in favour of the landlord has been passed. thus strictly speaking the matter does not appear to be fully covered by the full bench decision. this, however, does not result in.....
Judgment:

C.S.P. Singh, J.

1. Ramesh Chandra, who is the appellant before Us, filed an application for allotment of premises No. 5/21/71 mohalla Gul Shahead before the Rent Control and Eviction Officer on the 10th May, 1966. This application was allowed on the 30th May, 1966. In pursuance of this order Ramesh Chandra obtained possession on 6-6-1966. Hari Shan-ker, who is the landlord of the premises, filed a revision before the State Government under Section 7-F of the U. P. (Temporary) Control of Rent and Eviction Act, 1947 (hereinafter referred to as the Act). This representation was allowed by the State Government on the 21st July, 1967. A writ petition against the order of the State Government was filed by the allottee, Ramesh Chandra but it was subsequently withdrawn on 27-11-1968. Thereafter Hari Shanker appliedfor delivery of possession under Section 7-F of the Act. The application was allowed by the Rent Control and Eviction Officer on the view that as the allotment order in favour of Ramesh Chandra has been cancelled, therefore, his possession was that of an illegal occupant and, as such, ordered his eviction. A revision against the order of the Rent Control and Eviction Officer was filed, which was allowed by the Commissioner on the 30th April, 1970, on the view that proceedings under Section 7-A (1) and (2) could not be initiated against a person who has entered into possession on the basis of an allotment order. Aggrieved by this order, Hari Shanker, the landlord preferred a petition in this Cout which has given rise to this special appeal. The learned single Judge relying mainly on the Full Bench decision of this Court in Syed Ajaz Ali Khan v. Mohammad Rafiq, (AIR 1974 All 178) (FB) has allowed the petition.

2. The only point canvassed before us is that an order for eviction of the allottee could not have been passed under Section 7-A of the Act. It was contended that the Full Bench decision could not be appropriately applied to the facts of the present case.

3. We may begin our enquiry by considering as to whether the Full Bench decision in the case of Syed Ajaz Ali Khan (AIR 1974 All 178) (FB) (supra) is applicable to the present controversy, for if it is so, then the matter is res integra. In the Full Bench case the question referred was as to whether an order passed by the State Government cancelling an order of allotment and directing the release of the accommodation in favour of the landlord is an order passed under Section 7 (2) of the Act, within the meaning of Section 7-A of the Act. We may stress that in that case two orders were passed by the State Government, one, cancelling an order of allotment and the other directing the release of the accommodation in favour of the landlord. It was held by the Full Bench that in view of the vast amplitude of the powers which the State Government enjoys under Section 7-F, it could pass all orders which the Commissioner or the District Magistrate could pass. Where the order cancels an allotment order and directs the release of an accommodation in favour of the landlord it is an order passed under Sub-section (2) of Section 7 and supersedes the order passed by the District Magistrate under Section 7 (2). Such an order, according to the Full Bench, wasan order under Section 7 (2) within the meaning of Section 7-A (1) of the Act. In the present case, all that the State Government has done is to cancel the allotment order. No order of release in favour of the landlord has been passed. Thus strictly speaking the matter does not appear to be fully covered by the Full Bench decision. This, however, does not result in the acceptance of the contention raised on behalf of the appellant. It is now necessary to quote Section 7-A of the Act:--

'7-A (1) Where in pursuance of an order of the District Magistrate under Sub-section (2) of Section 7, the vacancy of any accommodation is required to be reported and is not so reported, or where an order requiring any accommodation to be let or not, to be let has been duly passed under Sub-section (2) of Section 7 and the District Magistrate believes or has reason to believe that any person has, in contravention of the said order, occupied the accommodation or any part thereof, he may call upon the person in occupation to show cause, within a time to be fixed by him, why he should not be evicted therefrom: Provided that no order under this section shall be passed if the District Magistrate is satisfied that there has been undue delay or it is otherwise inexpedient to do so.

(2) If such person fails to appear inreply to the notice served under Sub-section (1) or if he appears but fails to satisfy the District Magistrate that the order under Sub-section (2) of Section 7 was not duly passed and that he is entitled to remain in occupation of the accommodation the District Magistrate may without prejudice to any other action which may be taken against him under this Act or any other law for the time being in force, direct him to vacate the premises within a period to be specified.

(3) Upon the making of the order under Sub-section (2), the person against whom the order is made and every person claiming under him shall vacate the accommodation. If the accommodation is not vacated within the time, allowed or such extended period as the District Magistrate may grant, the District Magistrate may evict or cause to be evicted the person or persons and use such force as may be necessary for carrying out the order and also put the person entitled under Sub-section (2) of Section 7 in occupation of the accommodation.

(4) No appeal shall lie from any order passed by the District Magistrate under this section, but the Commissioner may revise the said order, if he is satisfied that the District Magistrate has acted illegally or with material irregularity or has wrongly refused to act and may make such order as he thinks fit.'

We are in the present case concerned with the latter part of Section 7-A which contemplates actions being taken by the District Magistrate in cases (1) where an order requiring any accommodation to be let or not to be let has been duly passed and the District Magistrate believes that any person has in contravention of the said order occupied the accommoda-or any part thereof. It is obvious, and there can hardly be any dispute, that before Section 7-A applies, the order, which is sought to be enforced must be under Section 7 (2). Now under Section 7 (2) two types of the orders can be passed, one, requiring a landlord to let and the other not to let. When an order to let is passed the order indicates that a landlord has to let out the premises to some specific person. The second type of order that can be passed under Section 7 (2) can be an order not to let out the premises to some specific person or to none. When an order of release is passed under Rule 6, it would fall under the second part, i.e., an order of release, in effect, is an order that the landlord should not let out the premises to any person but occupy it himself. But the second type of order which the District Magistrate can pass under Section 7 (2) of the Act need not be confined only to release orders. An order expressly or impliedly can be passed directing the landlord not to let out the premises to some specified person. We felt some difficulty as to whether the words 'any person' could be interpreted as meaning specific person, or all persons in general, but that difficulty is soon resolved if one considers the fact that under Section 7 (2) the District Magistrate is empowered to pass an allotment order in favour of some specified person. This he does by virtue of the powers conferred on him under Section 7 (2) of the Act, by the use of the words 'to let to any person'. The words 'any person' as occurring in Section 7 (2) qualify both to let or not to let, and if for purposes of letting the words 'any person' have to be interpreted, as necessarily they have to, to empower the District Magistrate to pass an order of allotment in respect of a specific person,we see no reason why the words 'not to let to any person' should have a different meaning. Once this result is reached, the contention on behalf of the appellant must fail. The order of the State Government passed under Section 7-F cancelling the allotment order in favour of the appellant amounted to an order directing that the premises should not be let out to him. This order, in view of the Full Bench decision wag an order under Section 7 (2). The appellant has obviously in contravention of this order occupied the premises for the order cancelling his allotment amounted to an order directing that the premises should not be let out to him Section 7-A was, therefore, clearly attracted, and, as such, an order of ejectment could be passed against him.

4. Counsel referred us to the decision in Krishna Chandra Sharma v. State of U. P., (1962 All LJ 426) but that decision has been overruled by the Full Bench and, as such, we need not consider it The single Judge decision in Kali Prasad Basu v. R. C. E. O., (1959 All LJ167) which lays down that the Rent Control and Eviction Officer does not have power under Section 7-A to put a subsequent allottee in possession even though the allotment order passed earlier is cancelled, does not appear to lay down the correct law. Once an order of allotment is cancelled, and a fresh order of allotment is passed it is the new order which replaces the earlier order, under Section 7 (2). The earlier order no longer exists and if the earlier allottee whose allotment order has been cancelled persists in occupation of the premises Section 7-A clearly applies. We may point out that a similar view was taken by a Division Bench in Mangal Sen v. Rent Control & Eviction Officer, (1972 All LJ 587).

5. The appeal is as such dismissed with costs. The stay order, if any is discharged.


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