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Mohan Lal and anr. Vs. Ladli Prasad and anr. - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCivil
CourtAllahabad High Court
Decided On
Case NumberSecond Appeal No. 858 of 1961
Judge
Reported inAIR1971All519
ActsCode of Civil Procedure (CPC) , 1908 - Sections 148, 149 and 151 - Order 9, Rule 13
AppellantMohan Lal and anr.
RespondentLadli Prasad and anr.
Appellant AdvocateJagdish Narain, Adv.
Respondent AdvocateH.D. Srivastava, Adv.
Excerpt:
.....for extension of period made - restoration application dismissed and court cannot extend the time period. - - in that case the order fixing time for payment of the court-fee was, no doubt, a peremptory order like the order dated 14-5-1970 passed by me and provided that in default of payment of court-fee within the time fixed, the appeal shall stand dismissed, but the appellant had moved an application praying for further time before the time so fixed had run out and it was on account of the circumstances beyond his control that this application could not be disposed of on that very day and it came before a division bench for hearing after that time had run out......of deficit court-fee, and the appellant made an application for extension of time before the time fixed had run out, but the application came on for hearing before a division bench after the period had run out, the high court was not powerless to enlarge the time even though it had peremptorily fixed the period for payment. in that case the order fixing time for payment of the court-fee was, no doubt, a peremptory order like the order dated 14-5-1970 passed by me and provided that in default of payment of court-fee within the time fixed, the appeal shall stand dismissed, but the appellant had moved an application praying for further time before the time so fixed had run out and it was on account of the circumstances beyond his control that this application could not be disposed of.....
Judgment:

Jagmohan Lal, J.

1. This application purporting to have been filed under Section 151 of the Code of Civil Procedure contains a prayer that the delay of one week in depositing the costs in compliance with my order dated 14-5-1970 may be condoned and the consequential order resulting in the dismissal of the restoration application for this non-compliance may be set aside and that the restoration application may be revived.

2. The facts of the case were that the Second Appeal No. 858 of 1961 was dismissed in default of the appellants on 1-8-1969. The appellants then applied for restoration of this appeal and that application was allowed by me conditionally on 14-5-1970 in the following terms:--

'In the interest of justice, I allow this application on payment of Rs. 30/-as costs which shall be paid within a week from this date. If the costs are paid within the time allowed the second appeal shall be restored to its original number. In case of default in the payment of costs, this application shall stand dismissed.'

3. The costs were not paid within the time allowed and so the application for restoration stood dismissed on 21-5-1970. Thereafter the appellants' counsel paid Rs. 30/- to respondents' counsel on 29-5-1970 and obtained a receipt from them. On 20-7-1970 the present application was made under Section 151. Civil P. C.

4. I have heard the learned counsel for the parties. The learned counsel for the petitioners contended that though the case would not be covered by Section 148, Civil P. C. this court can exercise its inherent power under Section 151 to grant the relief prayed for by the petitioners. In this connection he refers to a decision of the Supreme Court in Mahant Ram Das v. Ganga Das. : [1961]3SCR763 in which it was held that where a Bench of the High Court, while deciding an appeal in favour of the appellant, passed a peremptory order fixing the period for payment of deficit court-fee, and the appellant made an application for extension of time before the time fixed had run out, but the application came on for hearing before a Division Bench after the period had run out, the High Court was not powerless to enlarge the time even though it had peremptorily fixed the period for payment. In that case the order fixing time for payment of the court-fee was, no doubt, a peremptory order like the order dated 14-5-1970 passed by me and provided that in default of payment of court-fee within the time fixed, the appeal shall stand dismissed, but the appellant had moved an application praying for further time before the time so fixed had run out and it was on account of the circumstances beyond his control that this application could not be disposed of on that very day and it came before a Division Bench for hearing after that time had run out. On those facts it was held that even after the original time had run out the Court was not powerless to extend the time on the basis of the application that had been made prior to the fixed time running out and that in such a case the order so passed would be deemed to take effect from the date on which the application had been made for further extension of time. In the present case, as noted above, no such application for extension of time was given before the time fixed in the peremptory order had completely run out. The application was made more than two months thereafter. The peremptory order, which was a self-contained order, came into operation when the costs had not been paid till 21-5-1970. On these facts neither Section 148 nor Section 149 would be applicable nor the time can be extended under the inherent powers under Section 151. The Bench decision of this court in Gaya Din v. Lalta Prasad : AIR1936All477 is directly an authority on the point before us. In this case it was held that if the condition laid down in the peremptory order is not complied with within the time fixed in that order, and in the event of non-compliance, the order operates automatically and without further intervention of the court. Section 148 cannot be applied for the obvious reason that the court ceases to be seized of the matter and becomes functus officio.

5. The learned counsel for the petitioners referred to a Single Judge decision of this court in Beni Ram v. Sonpal (1970 All WE (HC) 143). In that case a peremptory order was passed in the following terms:--

'Heard. Adjourned to 17-1-1967 for F. H. on payment of Rs. 12/- as costs, by that date, failing which the suit shall stand automatically dismissed for default and non-prosecution'

It so happened that the business of the court was not carried on 17-1-1967 and in fact on that date the suit was never called for hearing, due to strike in the office of the court and then 7-3-1967 was the date fixed for hearing. On that date the suit was actually called for hearing and there was an offer on behalf of the plaintiff to deposit the amount of costs. But the court ordered that the suit stood automatically dismissed on 17-1-1967 in default of non-compliance with the condition laid down in the aforesaid order. In revision Asthana, J. held that on the facts stated above the peremptory order in question implied that the costs were to be deposited by the plaintiff on the next date of hearing that is to say on the date when the suit was actually called for hearing, and since due to unforeseen circumstances the business of the court could not be carried on 17-1-1967 and in fact the suit was never called up for hearing due to strike in the office of the court before 7-3-1967, this very date i. e. 7-3-1967 shall be deemed to be the date of hearing and upto that date the plaintiff could deposit the costs. Since the plaintiff had offered to pay the costs on that date he could not be deemed to be in default. It would be evident that the facts of that case were entirely different from the facts of the present case. In this case the order dated 14-5-1970 provided that the costs had to be paid by the appellant within a week from that order and it was open to the appellant to pay the same on any date within that period to the counsel for the respondents without any intervention of the court or to deposit the same in the court for payment to the respondents. The court was open for transacting business throughout this period. But the appellant neither offered to pay the costs nor applied for further extension of time. It was only after the time fixed had run out and the order had automatically taken effect in default of payment of these costs, that the appellants made this belated application on 20-7-1970. The application is, therefore, dismissed. No order for costs.


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