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The Punjab National Bank Vs. Lalji Tandon - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCivil
CourtAllahabad High Court
Decided On
Case NumberCivil Revn. No. 645 of 1983
Judge
Reported inAIR1984All381
ActsCode of Civil Procedure (CPC) , 1908 - Sections 115 - Order 6, Rule 17
AppellantThe Punjab National Bank
RespondentLalji Tandon
Appellant AdvocateK.L. Grover, Adv.
Respondent AdvocateS.R. Tripathi and ;Ravi Kant, Advs.
DispositionPetition dismissed
Excerpt:
.....before appellate court and so the order even if allowed to stand, could not occasion a failure of justice. 1983 summary of cases 111: (1983 all lj 896). it was held that the order of munsif refusing to allow amendment of plaint did not occasion failure of justice and so was not revisable. there was no plea in the written statement that the suit was bad for partial pre-emption......case of an innocent addition of a relief accidentally or inadverlently left out by mistake in the plaint. 8. learned counsel for revisionist relied upon rama shanker tiwari v. mahadeo. reported in 1968 all lj 109 (fb) where it was held that an order allowing or refusing an amendment was a 'case decided' within the meaning of explanation of section 115 of code of civil procedure. 9. the next authority has been reported in kisan co-operative sugar factory ltd. v. m/s. rajendra paper mills. : air1984all143 . it was a case of an amendment to add new party against whom limitation had already run out and so the amendment was refused. that order was upheld in revision. 10. in the instant case, the impugned order relates to a point of jurisdiction and as such the preliminary objection is.....
Judgment:
ORDER

N.N. Sharma, J.

1. This revision is directed against order dated 14-10-198.1 recorded by Sri Dinesh Chandra, learned IIIrd Additional District Judge, Allahabad allowing the application for amendment of plaint in Original Suit No. 8 of 1983, Lalji Tandon v. Punjab National Bank.

2. It appears that plaintiff Sri Lalji Tandon filed the aforesaid suit for :--

i. ejectment of defendant from the premises in dispute:

ii. recovery of Rs. 5,000/- for the damages caused to the tenement by defendant; and

iii. Rs. 157.27 for damages for use and occupation from 15-3-1983 to 4-4-1983 at the rate of Rs. 250/- per month as originally prayed.

3. Defendant raised an objection against the amendment which was rejected by the impugaed order.

4. I have heard learned counsel fur parties and perused the record.

5. A preliminary objection was raised before me on behalf of plaintiff that the impugned order was not revisable in view of the proviso appended to Section 115 of Code of Civil Procedure which reads as below :-- ...................

Provided that the High Court shall not under this section, vary or reverse any order made, or any order deciding an issue, in the course of a suit or other proceedings, except where :--

(a) the order, if it had been made in favour of the party applying for revision, would have finally disposed of the suit or other proceeding, or

(b) the order, if allowed to stand, would occasion a failure of justice or cause irreparable injury to the party against whom it was made.'

6. In this connection, reliance was placed upon Ram Narain Jaiswal v. Smt. Rajeshwari Devi reported in : AIR1978All214 . In that case in Suit No. 203 of 1973, defendant applied for amendment of written statement in the court of Munsif, Ghazipur. Learned Munsif rejected that prayer. It was found that the impugned order could not have finally disposed of the suit. The point could be reagitated before appellate court and so the order even if allowed to stand, could not occasion a failure of justice. No other facts were given in that authority.

7. The next authority cited before me has been reported in Thakur Krishna Jee Maharaj v. Pt. Jamuna Prasad. 1983 Summary of Cases 111: (1983 All LJ 896). It was held that the order of Munsif refusing to allow amendment of plaint did not occasion failure of justice and so was not revisable. The reasons given by learned Munsif for rejecting the said amendment disclosed that it was not simply a case of an innocent addition of a relief accidentally or inadverlently left out by mistake in the plaint.

8. Learned counsel for revisionist relied upon Rama Shanker Tiwari v. Mahadeo. reported in 1968 All LJ 109 (FB) where it was held that an order allowing or refusing an amendment was a 'case decided' within the meaning of explanation of Section 115 of Code of Civil Procedure.

9. The next authority has been reported in Kisan Co-operative Sugar Factory Ltd. v. M/s. Rajendra Paper Mills. : AIR1984All143 . It was a case of an amendment to add new party against whom limitation had already run out and so the amendment was refused. That order was upheld in revision.

10. In the instant case, the impugned order relates to a point of jurisdiction and as such the preliminary objection is repelled.

11. On behalf of revisionist, it was argued that since the relief for damages caused to the building was not cognizable by small causes court, the proper course for the court was to direct the return of plaint for presentation to the proper court. He should not have usurped the jurisdiction of the court on regular side nor he could have allowed the amendment when there was inherent lack of jurisdiction. In this connection reliance was placed upon Tirkha v. Ghasi Ram reported in : AIR1935All842 . It appears that suit was filed in a court which had no pecuniary jurisdiction to entertain it. The amendment allowed by the court was by reducing the amount claimed so as to bring it within the pecuniary jurisdiction of the Court. It was held that it was a fit order in which the High Court should interfere in revision.

12. The next authority relied upon has been reported in Akhilesh Chand Varshney v. Smt. Bhagwati Devi : AIR1976All42 . It related to an appeal. It was held that part of the suit was triable on regular side and part on small causes court's side (Act 1887). If so the entire suit has necessarily to be tried on the regular side. It is significant to note that it was not a case of revision.

13. The next authority relied upon has been reported in Banta singh Ganga Singh v. Smt. Harbhajan Kaur . It was a suit for preemption. There was no plea in the written statement that the suit was bad for partial pre-emption. This plea was sought to be introduced at appellate stage and so was held to have been rightly refused.

On behalf of respondent, my attention was invited to Kundal Lal v. Sri Narain Lal, reported in : AIR1958All96 . The facts of the case were as below :--

'The suit was for possession over a house. The defendant took possession of the house and after demolishing it constructed a new house in its place but this fact was not mentioned in the plaint and the relief claimed was just for possession of the plaintiffs house. The plaintiff applied for amendment of the plaint in order to make it clear that he sought possession over his old house and not over the new house constructed on its site by the defendant. The application for amendment was opposed by the defendant. The defendant pleaded that the value of the house constructed by him was more than Rs. 5,000/-. that consequently the suit was not within the jurisdiction of the lower court and that it had no jurisdiction to pass any order including one allowing the amendment.

Held, that through the amendment, the plaintiff had only clarified what he meant in the plaint; he did not want any reduction in the subject-matter covered by the plaint. When he wanted only to explain what he meant in the plaint, there could not arise any question of jurisdiction to allow the amendment. If plaintiff did not originally seek possession over the house constructed by the defendant at the cost of more than Rs. 5,000/- the suit was not beyond the jurisdiction of the lower Court. If the only effect of the amendment was that the plaintiff made this clear, there was nothing to bar the amendment being allowed.'

14. The earlier view taken by this Court in Tirkha v. Ghasi Ram : AIR1935All842 (supra) was dissented from.

15. A similar view was taken in Vabakktha Gopal Pillai Vasudeva Pillai v. National Small Industries Corporation Ltd. reported in : AIR1979Cal107 .

16. Thus in view of the said authorities. I find that even if the court has no jurisdiction to award the relief for damages caused to the building, it could have allowed the amendment. There was no lack of pecuniary jurisdiction in the court below, because the suit was entertainable by the District Judge on small causes court's side so far as the valuation of the suit was concerned.

17. The next contention raised on behalf of revisionist was that the amendment was mala fide; it should have been refused specially when the learned trial Judge himself found that the relief about the damages caused to the building could not be awarded by a Judge on small causes court side; the damages for use and occupation were claimed at the rate of Rs. 250/- per month and now the plaintiff sought to claim the damages at the rate of Rs. 200/- per day.

18. It appears that this contention also has no merit. From the perusal of the plaint (Annexure-I to the counter-affidavit), it appears that the damages for use and occupation were claimed at Rs- 200/- per day. On account of clerical error, the mistake crept in the relief sought. A copy of the notice annexed to the counter-affidavit (Annexure-2) by Sri Lalji Tandon shows that even in the notice, damages for use and occupation were claimed at the rate of Rs. 200/- per day. It was due to oversight and inadvertence that the amount noted in the relief was Rs. 250/- per month. So the learned trial Judge rightly observed that by the proposed amendment, plaintiff simply corrected a mistake in calculation. Thus there is nothing wrong or illegal in the impugned order which must operate.

19. So the revision and the stay application arc dismissed as devoid offorce.


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