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Mithan Lal Vs. Chhajju Singh - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
CourtAllahabad
Decided On
Judge
Reported in45Ind.Cas.529
AppellantMithan Lal
RespondentChhajju Singh
Excerpt:
.....act (iii of 1901), section 36. - - he is equally a thekadar under the contract of the 23rd of july 1908. if the period of that contract has oome to an end, then of course the plaintiff's claim must fail, because the theka no longer subsists, but so long as the theka subsists the plaintiff is entitled to recover from his thekadar the rent which the latter has agreed to pay. if the defendant bad pleaded and had proved to the court that the mortgage had come to an end, then the plaintiff's claim would have failed, but he is not allowed to raise a question of fact in second appeal on which there were no pleadings, on which there was no issues and to which no evidence was directed......there was no issues and to which no evidence was directed. the case must be decided on the assumption, right or wrong, that the mortgage still subsists and that bhuttu mal is the owner of the equity of redemption which was purchased in his name. this being so, the lease must still subsist and whether the defendant be or be not the ex-proprietary tenant of the land, he is liable as thekadar to his lessor. in this view we must allow the appeal, set aside the decree of the lower appellate court and restore that of the court of first instance. the plaintiff will have his costs in all courts. the court of first instance granted the plaintiff a' decree for what it has called usual interest.' this interest will run from the date of the suit up to the date of realization, and at the rate of 6.....
Judgment:

1. This is a plaintiff's appeal. The facts out of which it has arisen are briefly as follows: The defendant was the owner of a certain zimindari share, the area of which was some 13 bighas odd. On the 23rd of July 1908, he gave a usufructuary mortgage of this zemindari to the plaintiff. On the same date-the plaintiff gave him a lease of the same zemindari share on payment of a sum of Rs. 70-14-0 par annum plus Ra. 23-11-0 Government demand, e;c. The defendant remained in possession as thekadar paying his rent to the plaintiff under the lease. On the 2Cth of June 1912, the plaintiff sued him on the basis of that agreement for arrears of rent and obtained a decree and in execution of his decree for the arrears of rent due under the lease, he attached and put to sale the defendant's equity of redemption. This was sold on the 20th of March 1913, and was purchased by one Bhuttu Mal. At the time of the sale thp plaintiff's mortgage and one other mortgage were also notified. The price paid for the property at the sale was Rs. 40. Bhuttu Mal did not apply for mutation of names and the Government record still stands as it was on the date of the original mortgage. The plaintiff has now, on the basis of the lease, sued his thekadar, the defendant for the rent for a period which commenced prior to the 20th of March 1913 and runs up to a date subsequent to that date. The defendant in his written statement merely pleaded that he was liable for the rent up to the 20th of March 1913, but that for the period, subsequent to that he was no longer liable under the lease because his equity of redemption had been sold and purchased by Bhuttu Mal. The Court of first; instance in the course of its judgment made the remark that the mortgagor's right to redeem had been put to auction by the plaintiff-decree-holder who had purchased it far Bhuttu Mal on the 20th of March 1913.' It is quite clear that the defendant had nowhere pleaded that Buttu Mal was the benamidar of the plaintiff or that Buttu Mal had purchased the property for and on behalf of the plaintiff. There was no issue on this point. There waa no allegation or denial, no evidence and no finding. The Court of first instance held that the purchase by Bhuttu Mal of the defendant's equity of redemption did rot affect the case at all, that the lease subsisted and that the defendant was liable under the lease. It accordingly decreed the suit. The lower Appellate Court on the defendant's appeal has held that after the 20th of March 1913 the defendant became the ex-proprietary tenant of the land because the equity of redemption had been sold; that he was entitled to take up his position as an, ex-proprietary tenant and as no rent had been fixed, he was not liable to pay any rent for the period subsequent to the 20th of March 1913. The plaintiff appeals.

2. It is quite clear to us that the Judge of the Court below has misunderstood the nature of the plaintiffs claim. It is based on the theka which was given to the defendant on the 23rd of July 1908. yfe will assume that the defendant is the ex-proprietary tenant of the land. He is equally a thekadar under the contract of the 23rd of July 1908. If the period of that contract has oome to an end, then of course the plaintiff's claim must fail, because the theka no longer subsists, but so long as the theka subsists the plaintiff is entitled to recover from his thekadar the rent which the latter has agreed to pay. He may, as an ex-proprietary tenant, be a tenant of the land under himself as thekadar. If the theka had been given to an outside person, there is no question that so long as it subsists the thekadar would be liable for the rent. The lower Court in its judgment has stated that Bhuttu Mal appears to have been a benamidar for the plaintiff. It has, however, oome to no decision on the point, nor could it do so, for the simple reason that the issue had not been raised, no evidence taken upon it, and there had been no decision on it. The point would have been material if it had been raised, because the lease was to subsist only so long as the mortgage subsisted. If the defendant bad pleaded and had proved to the Court that the mortgage had come to an end, then the plaintiff's claim would have failed, but he is not allowed to raise a question of fact in second appeal on which there were no pleadings, on which there was no issues and to which no evidence was directed. The case must be decided on the assumption, right or wrong, that the mortgage still subsists and that Bhuttu Mal is the owner of the equity of redemption which was purchased in his name. This being so, the lease must still subsist and whether the defendant be or be not the ex-proprietary tenant of the land, he is liable as thekadar to his lessor. In this view we must allow the appeal, set aside the decree of the lower Appellate Court and restore that of the Court of first instance. The plaintiff will have his costs in all Courts. The Court of first instance granted the plaintiff a' decree for what it has called usual interest.' This interest will run from the date of the suit up to the date of realization, and at the rate of 6 per cent, per annum simple.


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