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Sita Ram and ors. Vs. State - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCriminal
CourtAllahabad High Court
Decided On
Judge
Reported in1981CriLJ65
AppellantSita Ram and ors.
RespondentState
Cases Referred(Jit Narain v. State
Excerpt:
.....wn 55 this court observed 'the appellant is entitled in law to have a hearing in this court of his appeal, but the loss of the record has deprived him of the only means of making good the pleas of the appeal. a situation like the present one arose before courts earlier also. it may be noted that the order for retrial was passed well within two years of the incident. in such a situation it is not permissible for us to affirm the order of conviction of the appellants, since in the absence of the record we cannot possibly feel satisfied that the appellants have been rightly convicted. due to lapse of time and non-availability of papers like first information report, statements under section 161, criminal procedure code etc, we do not consider it either just or expedient to order retrial of..........made at the trial with reference to the earlier version of the incident and the statements of witnesses recorded during investigation. not only that the accused will be prejudiced but even the prosecution would be greatly handicapped in establishing its case and the trial would be reduced to a mere formality entailing agony and hardship to the accused and waste of time, money and energy of the state.12. in the present case the incident took place on 23-8-1971. the appellants were convicted by the sessions court by an order dated 18-11-1974. the appeal has been pending in this court for about six years. we are informed that copies of the first information report and statements of witnesses recorded under section 161, cr. p.c. have been weeded out and are not available. all attempts.....
Judgment:

K.N. Seth, J.

1. On 23-8-1971 at about noon time an incident took place in village Kanaili, Police Station Sarai Aqil district Allahabad, in which Ganesh Din lost his life and Surya Bali Singh, Daya Ram Singh and Gaya Prasad Singh received injuries. In Sessions Trial No. 91 of 1973 the appellants have been found guilty for committing the murder of Ganesh Din and causing injuries to Surya Bali Singh and others. For the murder of Ganesh Din, Sita Ram has been sentenced to imprisonment for life under Section 302, I.P.C. The remaining four appellants, namely, Din Bandhu, Lalji, Ram Naresh and Sarwan Kumar have been awarded the same sentence under Section 302/149, I.P.C. The appellants have further been convicted and sentenced to various terms of imprisonments for other offences committed in the incident. The sentences have been directed to run concurrently.

2. Against the order of the learned Additional District and Sessions Judge, Allahabad, dated 18-11-1974 the present appeal was filed in this Court on 21-11-1974. While admitting the appeal this Court enlarged the appellants on bail. During the pendency of the appeal in this Court the original record was destroyed as a result of an accidental fire that broke out in the court below.

3. When the appeal was put up for hearing, an attempt was made to reconstruct the record. Ample opportunity was allowed to the State as well as to the appellants but the record could not be reconstructed. The question that has cropped up for consideration is whether the appeal can be decided on merit and if not what is the course to be adopted by this Court.

4. Section 385, Cr. P.C. provides that if the appellate court does not dismiss the appeal summarily, it shall cause notice of the time and place at which such appeal will be heard to be given (i) to the appellant or his pleader; (ii) to such officer as the State Government may appoint in this behalf; (iii) if the appeal is from a judgment of conviction in a case instituted upon complaint, to the complainant; (iv) if the appeal is under Section 377 or Section 378, to the accused, and shall also furnish such officer, complainant and accused with a copy of the grounds of appeal. Sub-section (2) provides that the appellate court shall then send for the record of the case, if such record is not already available in that Court, and hear the parties: provided that if the appeal is only as to the extent or the legality of the sentence, the Court may dispose of the appeal without sending for the record. Section 386 prescribes the powers of the appellate court. That power has to be exercised after perusing the record and hearing the appellant or his pleader, if he appears, and the Public Prosecutor, if he appears. In Queen-Empress v. Khimat Singh 1889 All WN 55 this Court observed 'the appellant is entitled in law to have a hearing in this Court of his appeal, but the loss of the record has deprived him of the only means of making good the pleas of the appeal....' A Division Bench of the Calcutta High Court in Abbash Ali v. Emperor (1913) 19 Ind Cas 182 : 14 Cri LJ 182 observed that the appellate court must peruse the record before deciding the appeal. A decision upon a perusal only of the judgment appealed against is not legal.

5. Since it is incumbent on the appellate court to send for the record and peruse it and hear the counsel for the parties before it can exercise its power under Section 386, the present appeal cannot possibly be heard and decided on merit.

6. The appellants have a right to show to this Court that the decision arrived at by the court below was not supported by the evidence on record. They can legitimately contend that material evidence and circumstances have either been ignored or incorrectly appraised. This right cannot be denied to the appellants. In the absence of the original record it is not possible for us to arrive at a decision that the impugned judgment is supported by the evidence on record and the order of conviction passed and the sentence imposed on the appellants is legally justified and proper.

7. In such a situation two courses are open to the Court; (1) to order retrial after setting aside the impugned judgment; or (2) to acquit the appellants. A situation like the present one arose before Courts earlier also. In re Sevugaperumal AIR 1943 Mad 391 (2) : 44 Cri LJ 611 the accused were convicted under Sections 457, 395 and 397 Penal Code, and sentenced to various terms of imprisonment. Following the decision of this Court in Queen-Empress v. Khimat Singh 1889 All WN 55 (supra) the Madras High Court ordered retrial after setting aside the convictions. From the reports of these decisions it is not clear how much time had elapsed between the incident and the date when retrial was directed. In the Madras case the impugned order of the trial court was dated 22-6-1942. The appeal was filed on 6-8-1942 and the original record was destroyed by fire on 17-8-1942. The appeal came up for hearing on 5-11-1942. It may be that the time lapse between the date of the incident and the date of decision by the appellate court was not long. Moreover the Public Prosecutor conceded in those cases that no other course was possible under the circumstances.

8. In Madhusudhan v. State 1963 (2) Cri LJ 103 (Orissa) the appellant was convicted under Section 302, I.P.C. and sentenced to imprisonment for life by an order of the Sessions Judge dated 17-4-1962. The incident had taken place on 29-3-1962. The appeal came up for hearing on 12-12-1962. The appellate court directed retrial of the case. It may be noted that the order for retrial was passed well within two years of the incident.

9. A similar situation arose before this Court in Zillar v. State 1956 All WR (HC) 613. In this case the appellants were convicted by the Sessions Judge on 21-1-1951 under Sections 304 and 148, I.P.C. in respect of the offence committed on 2-4-1950. The appeal was filed in this Court on 24-1-1951 which came up for hearing in April 1956 when it was brought to the notice of the Court that the entire record of the case had been lost. Attempt was made to reconstruct the record but it proved futile. This Court refused to direct retrial of the case on the reasoning that the case related to an offence which was committed more than six years ago and five years had elapsed since the judgment of the Sessions Judge convicting the appellants was passed. The court took into account the further fact that even the copies of the F.I.R. and the statements of witnesses taken under Section 161 Cr. P.C. were not available as they had been weeded out in the ordinary course.

10. A Division Bench of this Court in Criminal Appeal No. 3235 of 1971 (Jit Narain v. State) decided on 15-3-1978 in similar circumstances allowed the appeal and acquitted the appellants instead of directing their retrial.

11. On a careful consideration of the relevant statutory provisions and the principle laid down in the cases cited before us we are of the opinion that where it is not possible to reconstruct the record which has been lost or destroyed it is not legally permissible for the appellate court to affirm the conviction of the appellant since perusal of the record of the case is one of the essential elements of the hearing of the appeal. The appellant has a right to try to satisfy the appellate court that the material on record did not justify his conviction and that right cannot be denied to him. We are further of the opinion that if the time lag between the date of the incident and the date on which the appeal comes up for hearing is short, the proper course would be to direct retrial of the case since witnesses normally would be available and it would not cause undue strain on the memory of witnesses. Copies of F.I.R., statements of witnesses under Section 161, Cr. P.C. reports of medical examination etc. would also be normally available if the time gap between the incident and the order of retrial is not unduely long. Where, however, the matter comes up for consideration after a long gap of years, it would neither be just nor proper to direct retrial of the case, more so when even copies of F.I.R. and statements of witnesses under Section 161, Cr. P.C. and other relevant papers have been weeded out or are otherwise not available. In such a situation even if witnesses are available, apart from the fact that heavy strain would be put on the memory of witnesses, it would not be possible to test their statements made at the trial with reference to the earlier version of the incident and the statements of witnesses recorded during investigation. Not only that the accused will be prejudiced but even the prosecution would be greatly handicapped in establishing its case and the trial would be reduced to a mere formality entailing agony and hardship to the accused and waste of time, money and energy of the State.

12. In the present case the incident took place on 23-8-1971. The appellants were convicted by the Sessions Court by an order dated 18-11-1974. The appeal has been pending in this Court for about six years. We are informed that copies of the First Information Report and statements of witnesses recorded under Section 161, Cr. P.C. have been weeded out and are not available. All attempts to reconstruct the record have proved futile. In such a situation it is not permissible for us to affirm the order of conviction of the appellants, since in the absence of the record we cannot possibly feel satisfied that the appellants have been rightly convicted. Due to lapse of time and non-availability of papers like First Information Report, statements under Section 161, Criminal Procedure Code etc, we do not consider it either just or expedient to order retrial of the case.

13. In the circumstances the appeal is allowed. The order of the court below convicting and sentencing the appellants is set aside and they are acquitted. They are on bail. They need not surrender. Their bail bonds are discharged.


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