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Mst. Subhadra Vs. Narsaji Chenaji Marwadi - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectProperty
CourtSupreme Court of India
Decided On
Judge
Reported inAIR1966SC806; (1962)64BOMLR255; [1962]3SCR98
ActsBombay Rents, Hotel and Lodging Houses Rates, Control Act, 1947 - Sections 5(8); Bombay Land Revenue Code - Sections 65; Bombay Act, 1947 - Sections 11
AppellantMst. Subhadra
RespondentNarsaji Chenaji Marwadi
Excerpt:
.....rent - land assessed for agricultural purposes - material date for ascertaining whether the plot is premises is the date of letting and not the date of fixing the standard rent - plot could not be regarded as premises on the date of letting - appeal dismissed - indian evidence act, 1872 section 3 :[arijit pasayat & asok kumar ganguly,jj] appreciation of evidence - inference of guilt there from held, where a case rests squarely on circumstantial evidence, the inference of guilt can be justified only when all the incriminating facts and circumstances are found to be incompatible with the innocence of the accused or the guilt of any other person. the circumstances from which an inference as to the guilt of the accused is drawn have to be proved beyond reasonable doubt and have..........the plot on the dates of the three leases was assessed for agricultural purposes. under the bombay land revenue code v of 1879, land assessed for agricultural purposes may be used for non-agricultural purpose if permission in that behalf is granted by the collector. the appellant applied for permission for conversion of user of the land to non-agricultural purposes, and the collector of ahmedabad by order dated november 11, 1949, sanctioned conversion of the user. thereafter, the appellant by application dated october 27, 1950, applied to the court of small causes, ahmedabad for fixation of standard rent of the plot under section 11 of the bombay rents, hotel and lodging houses rates, control act, 1947 - hereinafter referred to as the act. the respondent contended that the land.....
Judgment:

Shah, J.

1. Plot No. 68 Town Planning Scheme No. 1 Jamalpur Ahmedabad, part of survey No. 405 Mouje Rajpur-Hirpur admeasuring approximately 38 Gunthas was owned by Bai Jekor and her two sisters. By a lease dated October 15, 1934, this plot of land was granted in lease by the owners in perpetuity to Gajjar Ramanlal Gordhandas and his brother at annual rental of Rs. 558. The lessees -Gajjars - sublet by a lease dated February 7, 1946, the plot also in perpetuity to Narsaji Chenaji Marwadi - hereinafter referred to as the respondent - at an annual rental of Rs. 1,425. The respondent by deed dated April 25, 1947, sublet the plot to Subhadra - hereinafter referred to as the appellant - at an annual rental of Rs. 2,225. In all these three deeds, it was recited that the lessees may construct buildings on the land and for obtaining sanction in that behalf, the lessors shall make applications to the Collector or any other authority for that purpose. The plot on the dates of the three leases was assessed for agricultural purposes. Under the Bombay Land Revenue Code V of 1879, land assessed for agricultural purposes may be used for non-agricultural purpose if permission in that behalf is granted by the Collector. The appellant applied for permission for conversion of user of the land to non-agricultural purposes, and the Collector of Ahmedabad by order dated November 11, 1949, sanctioned conversion of the user. Thereafter, the appellant by application dated October 27, 1950, applied to the Court of Small Causes, Ahmedabad for fixation of standard rent of the plot under section 11 of the Bombay Rents, Hotel and Lodging Houses Rates, Control Act, 1947 - hereinafter referred to as the Act. The respondent contended that the land when granted in lease being agricultural, the provisions of Bombay Act did not apply thereto and the application was not maintainable. The Court of Small Causes upheld the contention of the respondent and dismissed the application. This order was confirmed in appeal to the district Court at Ahmedabad and in a revision application to the High Court of Judicature at Bombay. The appellant had, with special leave, appealed to this court against the order of the High Court.

2. It is common ground that till November 11, 1949, the plot was assessed for agricultural purposes under the Bombay Land Revenue Code. In the year 1947, the plot was undoubtedly lying fallow, but on that account, the user of the land cannot be deemed be altered. User of the land could only be altered by the order of the Collector granted under section 65 of the Bombay Land Revenue Code. Section 11 of the Bombay Act 57 of 1947 enables a competent court upon application made to it for that purpose to fix standard rent of any premises. But section 11 is in art II of the Act and by section 6, clause (1), it is provided that in areas specified in Schedule I, Part II applies to premises let for residence, education, business, trade or storage. There is no dispute that Part II applied to the area in which the plot is situate; but before the appellant could maintain an application for fixation of standard rent under section 11, she had to establish that the plot of land leased was 'premises' within the meaning of section 5(8) of the Act and that it was let for residence, education, business, trade or storage. For the purposes of this appeal, it is unnecessary to consider whether the plot was let for residence, education, business, trade or storage. The expression 'premises' is defined by section 5(8) and the material part of the definition is :

'In this Act, unless there is anything repugnant to the subject or context -

x x x x

(8) 'premises' means -

(a) any land not being used for agricultural purposes,

(b) any building or part of a building let separately (other than a farm building) including -

(i) the garden, grounds, garages and out-houses if any, appurtenant to such building or part of a building,

(ii) any furniture supplied by the landlord for use in such building or part of a building,

(iii) any fittings affixed to such building or part of a building for the more beneficial enjoyment thereof.

x x x x

3. Reading section 5 sub-clause (8) with section 6(1), it is manifest that Part II of the Act can apply in areas specified in Schedule II to lands (not being used for agricultural purposes) let for residence, education, business, trade or storage. The material date for ascertaining whether the plot is 'premises' for purposes of section 6 is the date of letting and not the date on which the application for fixation of standard rent is made by the tenant or the landlord. We agree with the High Court that the plot in dispute could not be regarded as 'premises' inviting the application of Part II of the Act. The application filed by the appellant under section 11 for fixation of standard rent was therefore not maintainable.

4. The appeal fails and is dismissed with costs.

5. Appeal dismissed.


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