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Sant Ram Vs. Delhi State, G.R. Mittal Metropolitan Magistrate - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCriminal
CourtDelhi High Court
Decided On
Case NumberCriminal Writ Appeal No. 12 of 1980
Judge
Reported in17(1980)DLT490
ActsCode of Criminal Procedure (CrPC) , 1973 - Sections 488; Constitution of India - Article 226; Indian Penal code, 1860 - Sections 506; Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1932 - Sections 10
AppellantSant Ram
RespondentDelhi State, G.R. Mittal Metropolitan Magistrate
Advocates: K.K. Sood, Adv
Excerpt:
.....(amendment) act, 1932 - the notification was issued, declaring sections 188 and 506 of the indian penal code as non-bailable - the notification enforced prior to the commencement of the criminal procedure code, 1973 were saved by the section 484 (2) of the code - it held that the notification was unaffected by the repeal of the code of the 1898.b) the case discussed the effect of section 484 (2) of the criminal procedure code, 1973, on notification issued under criminal procedure code, 1898 - it was observed that all the notifications and laws in force were continued by the provision - it was held that the notification issued under section 10 of the criminal law amendment act, 1932 was unaffected by repeal of code and more over it continued to be in force under that provision. - - (2)..........for quashing criminal proceedings pending against him under sections 506 and 507 of the indian penal code. the petition has proceeded on- the basis that the said criminal proceedings on f.i.r. no. 629/75 registered .with the police station subzi mandi delhi, are illegal because offences under sections 506/507 of the indian penal code are not cognizable. some allegations have been made in the petition concerning some judicial officers, but it is unnecessary to repeat them in the judgment because they are of little relevance to the point urged.(2) a notice was issued to the delhi administration to show cause why the petition should not be admitted and a counter-affidavit has been filed which states the facts. the said reply shows that the petitioner had filed a complaint under section.....
Judgment:

Yogeshwar Dayal, J.

(1) The petitioner has filed the present Writ Petition under Articles 226 and 227 of the Constitution of India read with Section 482, Criminal Procedure Code for quashing criminal proceedings pending against him under Sections 506 and 507 of the Indian Penal Code. The petition has proceeded on- the basis that the said criminal proceedings on F.I.R. No. 629/75 registered .with the Police Station Subzi Mandi Delhi, are illegal because offences under Sections 506/507 of the Indian Penal Code are not cognizable. Some allegations have been made in the petition concerning some Judicial Officers, but it is unnecessary to repeat them in the judgment because they are of little relevance to the point urged.

(2) A notice was issued to the Delhi administration to show cause why the petition should not be admitted and a counter-affidavit has been filed which states the facts. The said reply shows that the petitioner had filed a complaint under Section 219 of the Indian Penal Code against Shri S.C.Jain, presently Additional District and Sessions Judge Delhi, which led to the petitioner being convicted and sentenced for contempt of Court. It is stated in the reply that the proceedings now before the Court of Shri G.P. Mittal Metropolitan Magistrate are the result of F.I.R. No. 629/75 filed under Sections 506/507/189, Indian Penal Code at Police Station Subzi Mandi. These proceedings are the result of a complaint filed by Shri S.C. Jain which led to the arrest of the petitioner on 6th October 1975. It is pointed out that the offence under Section 506, Indian Penal Code is cognizable and, thereforee, there is no error in the proceedings.

(3) Mr. K..K. Sood learned counsel for the Delhi Administration has referred us to the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1932, which allows the State Government under Section 10 of the Act to declare certain offences as cognizable offences. The same provision also allows the State Government to declare offences under Sections 188 and 506, of the Indian Penal Code as non-bailable. The provisions reads as under :

'10.Power of State Government to make certain offences cognizable and non-bailable. (1) The State Government may by notification in the Official Gazette, declare that any offence punishable under Sections 186, 189, 188, 190, 295A, 298, 505, 506 or 507 of the Indian Penal Code, when committed in any area specified in the notification shall notwithstanding anything contained in the Code of Criminal Procedure 1898, be cognizable, and thereupon the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1898 shall, while such notification remains in force, be deemed to be amended accordingly. (2) The State Government may, in like manner and subject to the like conditions, and with the like effect, declare that an offence punishable under Section 198 or Section 506 of the Indian Penal Code shall be non-bailable.'

Acting under this provision, a notification was issued on 11th January 1933, that offences under Sections 186, 188, 189 and 506 of the Indian Penal Code would be cognizable and offences under Sections 188 and 506 would be non-bailable. The said notification is as follows : 'Notification. 232-Home Delhi the 11th January 1933. In exercise of the powers conferred by Section 10 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1932, the Chief Commissioner of Delhi is pleased to declare. (1) That any offence punishable under Sections 186, 188, 189 and 506 of the Indian Penal Code, when committed in The Delhi Province, shall, notwithstanding anything contained in the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1898, be cognizable, and (2) that any offence punishable under Sections 188 or 506 of the Indian Penal Code shall be non-bailable. sd/- J.N.G. Johnson, Chief Commissioner, Delhi,'

(4) Thus, the main grievance of the petitioner that he has been proceeded against on an F.I.R. which was wrongly registered and the proceeding against him are void and Ultra virus of Articles 14 of the Constitution as being discriminatory has to fail because the offences of which the petitioner has been charged are cognizable as well as non-bailable in the Union Territorry of Delhi as it now exists. The petitioner urged that the effect of the passing of the Criminal Procedure Code, 1973 was to terminate the effect of the said notification, but this is obviously not so. All notifications and laws previously in force are continued by Section 484(2) of the new Act, and in any case, the notification was issued under the Amendment Act, 1932 which is not at all affected by the repeal of the Criminal Procedure Code of 1898.

(5) The petitioner then wanted the proceedings to be quashed on the ground that no case was made out. He said that in spite of several prosecution witnesses having been examined, no prima facie case had been made out. Learned counsel for the State urged that the prosecution evidence was not yet complete. It is unnecessary to deal with this point because no ground has been taken in the Writ Petition to the effect that the proceedings should be quashed because of the absence of a prima facie case against the petitioner. We cannot allow a ground to be taken which is not in the Writ petition. So, we make no observations on this question. In view of our conclusions, we dismiss this Writ Petition.


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