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Gujarat State Road Transport Corporation Vs. Jamnadas Becharbhai - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectLabour and Industrial
CourtGujarat High Court
Decided On
Judge
Reported in(1982)2GLR557
AppellantGujarat State Road Transport Corporation
RespondentJamnadas Becharbhai
Cases ReferredR.M. Farmer v. Gujarat Electricity Board Baroda
Excerpt:
.....but then merely because we cannot prevent the sharks escaping we cannot permit the fly to trifle with public property which is the poor men's collective property (if we envision for them a sunlit day even on some distant morrow in the hidden future). under the circumstances, the labour court was not justified in reinstating a conductor who had collected fare, pocketed the same, and robbed the national exchequer, in the same post where he could re-indulge in the same weakness at public cost......any fault.4. in order not to attract the charge of arbitrariness it has to be ensured that the penalty imposed is commensurate with the magnitude of the fault. surely one cannot rationally or justly impose the same penalty for giving a slap as one would impose for homicide.5. when penalties of different categories can be imposed in respect of the alleged fault one of which is dismissal from service, the disciplinary authority per force is required to consult himself for selecting the most appropriate penalty from out of the range of penalties available that can be imposed, having regard to the nature, extent and gravity of the default. unless the disciplinary authority reaches the conclusion that having regard to the nature, content and magnitude of the fault committed by the.....
Judgment:

M.P. Thakkar, C.J.

1. There is a time for everything. There is a time for showing sympathy. There is also a time for being strict. Problems arise when one enters by the wrong 'time-door' and shows sympathy where strictness is called for and vice versa. And the present is the case which sharpens the profile of this problem. The Gujarat State Road Transport Corporation had dismissed a conductor who was found guilty of collecting fare from passengers without issuing tickets. The Labour Court which was exercising jurisdiction for reducing punishment under Section 11-A of the Industrial Disputes Act of 1947 had undoubtedly wide discretion in the matter of reduction of punishment, as held by us in R.M. Farmer v. Gujarat Electricity Board Baroda 23(1) G.L.R. 352. We reaffirm the nine propositions enunciated therein, viz.:

(1) There is widespread unemployment in our country and it is difficult to secure a job to earn enough to keep body and soul together unlike in developed countries:

(2) The State does not provide social benefits like unemployment allowance to enable a discharged employee to sustain himself and his family to some extent, as is being done in the developed countries:

(3) In imposing punishment on an erring employee an enlightened approach informed with the demands of the situation and the philosophy and spirit of the times requires to be made. It cannot be a matter of ipse dixit of the disciplinary authority depending on his whim or caprice:

(4) Be it administration of criminal law or the exercise of disciplinary jurisdiction in departmental proceedings, punishment is not and cannot be the 'end' in itself. Punishment for the sake of punishment cannot be the motto. Whilst deliberating upon the jurisprudential dimension the following factors must be considered:

1. In a disciplinary proceeding for an alleged fault of an employee punishment is imposed not in order to seek retribution or to give vent to feeling of wrath.

2. The main purpose of a punishment is to correct the fault of the employee concerned by making him more alert in the future and to hold out a warning to the other employees to be careful in the discharge of their duties so that they do not expose themselves to similar punishment. And the approach to be made is the approach parents make towards an erring or misguided child.

3. It is not expedient in the interest of the administration to visit every employee against whom a fault is established with the penalty of dismissal and to get rid of them. It would be counter productive to do so for it would be futile to expect to recruit employees who are so perfect that they would never commit any fault.

4. In order not to attract the charge of arbitrariness it has to be ensured that the penalty imposed is commensurate with the magnitude of the fault. Surely one cannot rationally or justly impose the same penalty for giving a slap as one would impose for homicide.

5. When penalties of different categories can be imposed in respect of the alleged fault one of which is dismissal from service, the disciplinary authority per force is required to consult himself for selecting the most appropriate penalty from out of the range of penalties available that can be imposed, having regard to the nature, extent and gravity of the default. Unless the disciplinary authority reaches the conclusion that having regard to the nature, content and magnitude of the fault committed by the employee concerned it would be absolutely unsafe to retain him in service, the maximum penalty of dismissal cannot be imposed. If a lesser penalty can be imposed without seriously upraising the interest of the employer the disciplinary authority cannot impose the maximum penalty of dismissal from service. He is bound to ask his inner voice and rational faculty why a lesser penalty cannot be imposed.

6. It cannot be overlooked that by and large it is because the maximum penalty is imposed and total ruination stares one in the eyes that the employee concerned is obliged to approach the Court and avail of the costly and time-consuming machinery to challenge in desperation the order passed by the disciplinary authority. If a lesser penalty was imposed, he might not have been obliged to make recourse to costly legal proceedings which result in loss of public time and also result in considerable hardship and misery to the employee concerned.

7. When the disciplinary proceedings end in favour of the employee the employer has often to pay back-wages say for about five years without being able to take work from the employee concerned. On the other hand, the employee concerned would have had to suffer economic misery and mental torture for all these years. Even the misery of being obliged to remain idle without work would constitute an unbearable burden. And when the curtain drops every one is left with a bitter taste in the mouth. All because extreme penalty of dismissal or removal is imposed instead of a lighter one.

8. Every harsh order removal from service creates bitterness and arouses a feeling of antagonism in the collective mind of the workers and gives rise to a feeling of class conflict. It does more harm than good to the employer as also to the society.

9. Taking a petty article by a worker in a moment of weakness when he yields to a temptation does not call for an extreme penalty of dismissal from service. More particularly when he does not hold a sensitive post of trust (pilferage by a cashier or by a store-keeper from the stores in his charge, for instance, may be viewed with seriousness). A worker brought up and living in an atmosphere of poverty and want when faced with temptation, ought not to, but may, yield to it in a moment of weakness. It cannot be approved, but it can certainly be understood particularly in an age when even the rich commit economic offences to get richer and do so by and large with impunity. (And even tax evasion or possession of black money is not considered to be dishonorable by and large). A penalty of removal from service is therefore not called for when a poor worker yields to a moment of temptation and commits an offence which often passes under the honorable name of kleptomania when committed by the rich.

2. We are however constrained to elaborate the rider added by us in Proposition No. 9 wherein it has been observed by us that when an employee holding a sensitive post of trust has been dismissed from service the matter may have to be viewed in a different light. By way of illustration we have referred to pilferage by a cashier or a store-keeper from the stores in his charge. Perhaps we should have anticipated a situation like the present and referred to misappropriation by a bus conductor who has collected fare from passengers but has failed to issue tickets to them. If a bus conductor has been dismissed in such circumstances, his reinstatement in the same post would enable him to indulge in the same mal-practice in future. Everyday he has to collect fare and issue tickets. Reinstatement in the same post would therefore involve grave risk because of the repetitive opportunity that he would get to indulge in the mal-practice and the daily temptation that he would face. Perhaps he would be tempted to repair the past losses. Under the circumstances, when in a fit case the Labour Court reaches the conclusion that misappropriation by a bus conductor has been established (in view of the evidence showing that be bad collected the fare from the passengers but had not issued tickets though he had sufficient opportunity to do so in circumstances going to show that there was a dishonest intention), the Labour Court would have to think more than twice before directing reinstatement in the same post as conductor wherein he would be afforded the same opportunity or faced with the same temptation and the Corporation would be exposed to the same risk every day. Be it realised that misappropriation by a bus conductor must be viewed with a degree of seriousness especially having regard to the fact that it would make successful working of a public Corporation impossible. In case misappropriation by a conductor is detected and be is found guilty, punishment must be deterrent to him as also to others, for misappropriation in such circumstances would be in relation to public moneys and the burden would fall on the shoulders of the common man. And be it realised that 80 per cent of the total tax burden consists of indirect taxes which makes it impossible for the common man to stand erect and virtually makes him crouch on the ground. There is another tormenting reason for viewing the matter with anxious eyes. The Public Sector can never (NEVER) succeed if 'everyone's' property (which it in fact is) is treated as 'no one's property. The New Culture for the New Man of New India must therefore be National Interest above all other interests including self-interest, sectional interest or class-interest. And therefore the bus conductor, poor, as he is, may have to suffer. We suffer more than him in having to say so, particularly because big sharks never get caught. If they get caught they more often than not escape with impunity. But then merely because we cannot prevent the sharks escaping we cannot permit the fly to trifle with Public Property which is the poor men's collective property (if we envision for them a sunlit day even on some distant morrow in the hidden future). Under the circumstances, the Labour Court was not justified in reinstating a conductor who had collected fare, pocketed the same, and robbed the National Exchequer, in the same post where he could re-indulge in the same weakness at public cost. The Labour Court can, depending upon facts and circumstances of the case and of the offender direct that he should be absorbed in the workshop section or some other similar post which does not involve daily handling of money. That must be left to the Labour Court. And the Labour Court would have to decide the issue having regard to facts and circumstances of each case and the demands of the situation in the context of each matter.

3. In the present case this aspect has not been considered by the labour Court. We therefore allow the petition, quash and set aside the order as per Annexure 'A' and send the matter back to the Labour Court for a fresh decision in accordance with law. Both the sides will be at liberty to produce such material as they desire in regard to the question of substituting some other penalty. It will be open to the Labour Court to take such view as the circumstances of the case demand, bearing in mind the aforesaid dimension of the case.

Rule absolute to this extent. No order regarding costs.

4. The matter will now be placed before a learned Judge of the Labour Court other than the learned Judge who passed the impugned order.


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