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Ponnuswami Pillay Vs. Singaram Pillay - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectProperty;Civil
CourtChennai
Decided On
Judge
Reported in(1918)ILR41Mad731
AppellantPonnuswami Pillay
RespondentSingaram Pillay
Cases ReferredSri Raja Prakasaravanim Garu v. Venkata Rao I.L.R.
Excerpt:
indian evidence act (i of 1872), section 165 - suit under registration act (xvi of 1908), section 77--suit to enforce registration of a will--evidence taken before sub-registrar, filed in court by the consent of parties--evidence, not found to be relevant under section 33 of the act or otherwise--judgment and decree, based on such evidence, whether valid. - .....become relevant evidence in the present case, if the conditions prescribed by section 33 of the indian evidence act were found by the subordinate judge to exist. there is nothing to even suggest and it cannot be contended that the subordinate judge applied his mind to the question and decided (for instance) that the presence of the witnesses could not be obtained without un reasonable delay and expense; his judgment shows that he proceeded solely on the ground of the consent of parties. that is to say, the statements recorded by the sub-registrar were not relevant under section 33 of the indian evidence act; and the learned vakil for respondent is unable to suggest any other section under which they would be relevant. but section 165 of the indian evidence act lays down that the.....
Judgment:

Ayling, J.

1. Appellant in this case takes the preliminary Ayling, J. ground that the judgment cannot be supported in view of the provisions of Section 165 of the Indian Evidence Act.

2. The suit was brought under Section 77 of the Registration Act to enforce registration of a will which both the Sub-Registrar and District Registrar had declined to register. The Subordinate Judge says (paragraph 4 of his judgment):

The parties filed the evidence adduced before the registering authorities as evidence in this case by mutual consent. None of them wanted any further evidence to be adduced in this Court. They were content to argue the case on the evidence adduced before the registering authorities.

3. The evidence in question on a consideration of which the case was decided included the statements of nine witnesses for plaintiff and eight witnesses for defendant recorded by the Sub-Registrar. These statements could only become relevant evidence in the present case, if the conditions prescribed by Section 33 of the Indian Evidence Act were found by the Subordinate Judge to exist. There is nothing to even suggest and it cannot be contended that the Subordinate Judge applied his mind to the question and decided (for instance) that the presence of the witnesses could not be obtained without un reasonable delay and expense; his judgment shows that he proceeded solely on the ground of the consent of parties. That is to say, the statements recorded by the Sub-Registrar were not relevant under Section 33 of the Indian Evidence Act; and the learned vakil for respondent is unable to suggest any other section under which they would be relevant. But Section 165 of the Indian Evidence Act lays down that the judgment must be based upon facts declared by this Act, to be relevant and duly proved, and the consent of parties cannot take the place of a declaration of the Evidence Act.

4. Our attention has been drawn to a decision of this Court in Sri Raja Prakasaravanim Garu v. Venkata Rao I.L.R. (1915) Mad. 160, in which it might appear that the consent of parties was held to be sufficient. But the attention of the learned Judges does not seem to have been drawn to the stringent provisions of Section 165 of the Indian Evidence Act above quoted; and with all respect we think we are justified in declining to follow their decision.

5. We must, therefore, set aside the decree and judgment of the lower Court and direct that the suit be restored to file and disposed of according to law.


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