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R. Balakrishnan Vs. Assistant Collector of Central Excise - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCustoms
CourtChennai High Court
Decided On
Case NumberCriminal Revision No. 881 of 1975 and Cr. R.P. No. 871 of 1975
Judge
Reported in1979(4)ELT195(Mad)
ActsGold Control Act - Sections 8(1) and 85(1); Customs Act - 111, 123 and 135
AppellantR. Balakrishnan
RespondentAssistant Collector of Central Excise
DispositionPetition dismissed
Cases ReferredBalakrishna v. State of West Bengal
Excerpt:
.....petitioner and the other person driving the scooter told him that they were carrying gold and the gold bars concealed under the petrol tank were recovered under a mahazar, ex. 3, the statement given by the revision petitioner very clearly shows that he has been smuggling gold on two or three occasions earlier and that he was asked by govindan to carry gold in the scooter and to deliver it at madurai. further, the presumption implied in section 123 of the customs act is that if the goods are seized in the reasonable belief that they were smuggled and if the accused fails to show that such goods are of indigenuous origin, an inference that such goods are smuggled would clearly arise in favour of the prosecution. 2 very clearly shows that the revision petitioner had the necessary knowledge..........1 seized the gold under ex. p. 1 mahazar attested by p.w. 5 under the reasonable belief that the gold bars were smuggled into india from a foreign country. he seized the scooter with registration no. tmc 2286 and a new pocket transistor radio 'expo 70' under the provisions of the customs act. pw 3, chari, superintendent of central excise, examined the revision petitioner on 5-11-1971 at about 7 a.m. and recorded ex. p. 3, statement in the presence of pw 5, the village munsif. the collector of central excise sanctioned prosecution and the assistant collector of centra' excise, vellore, laid the charge sheet.2. the learned trial magistrate found the revision petitioner and the other person guilty under section 8(1)(ii) and (iii) and section 85(1) of the gold control act and section 111.....
Judgment:

Maheswaran, J.

1. The scooter bearing registration No. TMC. 2286 driven by one Dhanapal the revision petitioner in Crl. R.C. No. 840 of 1975 was intercepted at about 9-30 A.M. On 4-11-1971, near the Commercial tax checkpost at Hosur on the Bangalore Hosur trunk road in between 39 - 4 and 39 - 6 Kms. stones by P.W. 1, Rayamond, Inspector of Central Excise and P.W. 2, S.M. Nizar, Intelligence Officer, Revenue Intelligence, Madras, and other officers. On the pillion was the revision petitioner. The officers felt suspicious as the revision petitioner and the other person who was driving the scooter found it difficult to push the scooter as it was very heavy. PWs. 1 and 2 asked them the reason for the difficulty in pushing the scooter when both the revision petitioner and the other person confessed that they were carrying bars of gold. P.W. 4, Sadiq a mechanic, who was sent for by P.Ws 1 and 2, opened the petrol tank of the scooter in the presence of PW 5, village munsif and PWs 1 and 2 found five cloth bags each containing 100 bars of gold of foreign origin with the markings 'Johnson Mzthey - 9990 London' concealed underneath the petrol tank of the scooter. There were about 500 bars of gold of 24 ct. purity valued at Rs. 11,40,000, PW 1 seized the gold under Ex. P. 1 mahazar attested by P.W. 5 under the reasonable belief that the gold bars were smuggled into India from a foreign country. He seized the scooter with registration No. TMC 2286 and a new pocket transistor radio 'Expo 70' under the provisions of the Customs Act. PW 3, Chari, superintendent of Central Excise, examined the revision petitioner on 5-11-1971 at about 7 a.m. and recorded Ex. P. 3, statement in the presence of PW 5, the village munsif. The Collector of Central Excise sanctioned prosecution and the Assistant Collector of Centra' Excise, Vellore, laid the charge sheet.

2. The learned trial Magistrate found the revision petitioner and the other person guilty under Section 8(1)(ii) and (iii) and Section 85(1) of the Gold Control Act and Section 111 read with Section 135(b) of the Customs Act and convicted them thereunder and sentenced them to undergo rigorous imprisonment for two years under each count, the sentences to run concurrently and also to pay a line of Rs. 2000 each, in default to undergo rigorous imprisonment for nine months. In appeal, the learned Sessions Judge confirmed the convictions and sentences. Aggrieved, the revision petitioner has filed this revision.

3. The case of the revision petitioner was that he was asked by Govindan to go in the scooter along with the first accused and was paid Rs. 75 and that he merely accompanied the first accused Dhanapal, the revision petitioner in Cr. 1 R.C. No. 840 of 1975, and that he did not know that gold bars were kept concealed in the scooter and that he was beaten by the Customs Officers to give a statement.

4. There are no merits in this petition. The evidence of PW 1 and PW 2 very clearly show that the scooter was intercepted. The evidence of PW 1 would clearly show that the revision petitioner and the other person driving the scooter told him that they were carrying gold and the gold bars concealed under the petrol tank were recovered under a mahazar, Ex. P.I. PW 2, S.M. Nizar, another officer who was present at the time of the seizure corroborated the evidence of PW 1. PW 4, Sadiq, a mechanic, spoke to the dismantling of the scooter and to the seizure of the gold biscuits with foreign marking. PW 4 has attested the mahazar, Ex. P.1. PW 5, the village munsif, was present at the time of seizure and has attested the mahazar, Ex. P.1. It is, therefore, clear that the revision petitioner and the other person were found in possession of goods with foreign markings. Both of them did not have a permit or licence issued by the Reserve Bank of India. Ex. P. 3, the statement given by the revision petitioner very clearly shows that he has been smuggling gold on two or three occasions earlier and that he was asked by Govindan to carry gold in the scooter and to deliver it at Madurai. He was, therefore, aware that he was carrying gold of foreign origin. It is futile for him now to contend that he was not aware of the fact that gold bars were kept concealed in the petrol tank of the scooter. The revision petitioner was not a mere carrier, because he was aware that the gold which he was carrying is smuggled gold of foreign origin. In view of the provisions of Section 123 of the Customs Act (LII of 1962) and the fact that the gold has been seized in the belief that it was smuggled as it contained foreign markings, it is the duty of the revision petitioner to have repelled the presumption by adducing evidence to show that the origin was not foreign at all and therefore, the gold could not be held to be smuggled. Further, the presumption implied in Section 123 of the Customs Act is that if the goods are seized in the reasonable belief that they were smuggled and if the accused fails to show that such goods are of indigenuous origin, an inference that such goods are smuggled would clearly arise in favour of the prosecution. Ex. P.2 very clearly shows that the revision petitioner had the necessary knowledge that the gold was smuggled gold and therefore liable for confiscation. I earlier pointed out that the revision petitioner was not in possession of the permit or licence for his possession of gold of foreign origin. There is, therefore, clear proof that the gold is smuggled gold. In Vallabhdas Liladhar v. Asst. Collector of Customs, AIR 1965 S.C. 481, the Supreme Court has observed as follows --

'Once it is proved that the gold is smuggled gold, it follows that it was brought into the country without payment of duty or in violation of the prohibition or restriction in force and whosoever brought it and whosoever dealt with it thereafter knowing it to be smuggled in the manner provided in the section must be held to have the intention of evading the payment of duty or violating the prohibition or restriction'.

Following this observation, with respect, I am of the view that the conviction of revision petitioner is correct.

5. The learned counsel for the petitioner contended that the sentence is too severe and that the court may consider reducing the sentence of imprisonment to the period already undergone. In answer, I may extract the observations of the Supreme Court in Balakrishna v. State of West Bengal, : 1974CriLJ280 . The following are the observations :

The new horizons in penal treatment with hopeful hues of correction and rehabilitation are statutorily embodied in India in some special enactments; but crimes professionally committed by deceptively respectable members of the community by inflicting severe trauma on the health and wealth of the nation - and the numbers of this neo-criminal tribe are rapidly escalating - form a deterrent exemption to human softness in sentencing.'

6. Following these observations, with great respect, I decline to interfere on the question of sentence. The convictions and the sentences are confirmed and the revision petition is dismissed.


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