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Dr. Cherian Vs. P. Ramasami Naidu and ors. - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCivil
CourtChennai High Court
Decided On
Reported in(1980)2MLJ170
AppellantDr. Cherian
RespondentP. Ramasami Naidu and ors.
Cases ReferredKrishnaswami Goundar v. Palani Gounder
Excerpt:
- p. venugopal, j.1. the appellant before this court is the court auction-purchaser. respondents 1 and 2 are the judgment-debtors and the third respondent is the decree-holder. the third respondent filed a suit o.s. no. 100 of 1968 on the file of the sub-court, coimbatore, on a hundi executed by respondents 1 and 2(husband and wife) and obtained a decree on 20th june, 1968 for a sum of rs. 9,777. 70. the third respondent filed e. p. no. 248 of 1968 for attachment and sale of the house belonging to the second respondent situated in coimbatore. the property was attached and even while the execution petition was pending, the third respondent filed another execution petition e. p. no. 42 of 1969 for attachment, and sale of lands belonging to the first respondent in selakarichal village,.....
Judgment:

P. Venugopal, J.

1. The Appellant before this Court is the Court auction-purchaser. Respondents 1 and 2 are the judgment-debtors and the third respondent is the decree-holder. The third respondent filed a suit O.S. No. 100 of 1968 on the file of the Sub-Court, Coimbatore, on a hundi executed by respondents 1 and 2(husband and wife) and obtained a decree on 20th June, 1968 for a sum of Rs. 9,777. 70. The third respondent filed E. P. No. 248 of 1968 for attachment and sale of the house belonging to the second respondent situated in Coimbatore. The property was attached and even while the execution petition was pending, the third respondent filed another execution petition E. P. No. 42 of 1969 for attachment, and sale of lands belonging to the first respondent in Selakarichal village, Palladam taluk. The properties were brought to sale and as there was no bidder, the execution petition was dismissed on 29th June, 1970 and the attachment was allowed to continue for a period of six months from that date. On 25th January, 1971, the house property in Coimbatore belonging to the second respondent was sold in Court-auction and the said sale was duly confirmed and part satisfaction was recorded and E. P. No. 42 of 1969 was closed on 27th February, 1971. Soon after the filing of E. P. No. 42 of 1969 and long before the property belonging to the second respondent was brought to sale, the third respondent filed E. A. No. 42 of 1969 on 6th January, 1969 for transmitting the decree to the Sub-Court, Dindigul for execution on the ground that the first respondent owned certain properties in that Court's jurisdiction. Transmission was ordered on 8th January, 1969 without notice to respondents 1 and 2. After transmission the third respondent filed E. P. No. 67 of 1969 for attachment and sale of the Ginning Factory with its machinery and the adjoining land belonging to the first respondent. The properties were duly attached without notice to respondents 1 and 2. The properties were not sold for want of bidders. The E. P. was dismissed on 20th March, 1970, keeping the attachment pending. The third respondent filed another E. P. No 46 of 1970, on 18th April, 1970. Notice under Order 21, Rule 66, Civil Procedure Code, was ordered and no personal service was affected on respondents 1 and 2. On 21st July, 1971, the Ginning Factory, machinery and the adjoining land were sold for Rs. 64,500 to the appellant. Part satisfaction was entered and the E. P. was dismissed on 4th December, 1972. The first respondent filed E. A No. 345 of 1971 in the Sub-Court, Dindigul under Order 21, Rule 90, Civil Procedure Code to set aside the sale on the ground of material irregularities in the publication and conduct of the sale. The first respondent furnished security which was rejected on being tested. The matter was not further pursued and the first respondent filed E. A. No. 614 of 1972 under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code, for a declaration that the Court sale of the ginning factory, machinery and the adjoining land on 21st July, 1971 was void.

2. Before the executing Court it was contended that simultaneous execution taken out against the first respondent in both the Courts one at Coimbatore and one at Dindigul without notice is bad in law, and the sale of the machinery, ginning factory and adjoining land without notice to the first respondent is invalid and inoperative, and as the judgment-debtors' valuation had not been disclosed in the sale proclamation, the sale is liable to be set aside.

3. The executing Court held that simultaneous execution as contemplated in the Code of Civil Procedure is the execution levied both against the property and person of a judgment-debtor and not proceeding in execution taken out against different properties of the same judgment-debtor, and proceedings taken by the third respondent decree-holder in both the Courts are valid in law and they would not vitiate the Court auction sale of the ginning factory and machinery and adjoining land belonging to the first respondent. The executing Court further held that there was no fraud or irregularity in the conduct of sale. Against the order of the executing Court there was an appeal to the District Court and the learned District Judge held-

(1) While ordering the transmission of the decree from the Sub-Court at Coimbatore to the Sub-Court at Dindigul, the first respondent must have been put on notice and heard to avoid hardship, and this by itself is not sufficient to make the sale held in execution of the decree in E. P. No. 45 of 1970 void; (2) there has been no proper compliance with the first part of Order 3, Rule 19, Civil Procedure Code, and there is only an endorsement on the back of the notice that the judgment-debtor (respondent No. 1 herein) was not available and in the absence of an affidavit, the execution Court ought to have examined the serving officer on oath to testify to the facts stated in the endorsement made by him in the notice and as this procedure has not been followed, the sals held was without proper notice to the first respondent and it has to be set aside. (3) The sale proclamation does not contain the judgment-debtors' valuation and the sale ie liable to be set aside on this ground as wall. On these findings the learned District Judge set aside the sale held on 21st July, 1971 in E.P. No. 46 of 1970. Aggrieved against the order of the learned District Judge the Court auction-purchaser has filed this appeal before this Court.

4. The first respondent filed E. A. No. 345 of 1971 in E. P. No. No. 46 of 1970 in O S No. 100 of 1968 on the file of the Sub-Court, Dindigul, to set aside the sale. Though it purports, to be a petition under Order 21, Rule 90, Civil Procedure Code., the first respondent apart from alleging material irregularity and fraud in publishing and conducting the sale has further alleged that notice of sale proceedings was not served on him. The petition was dismissed as sufficient security was not furnished by the first respondent. Learned Counsel for the appellant contended that having raised the plea regarding lack of service of notice of sale proceedings in B. A. No. 345 of 1971 and having allowed the same to be dismissed by failing to furnish adequate security, the first respondent is barred by the principle of constructive res judicata to raise the same plea in E. A No. 614 of 1972 which is the subject-matter of the present appeal. Relying on the three decisions of the Supreme Court in Mohanlal Goenka v. Benoy Krishna Mukherjee and Ors. : [1953]4SCR377 , Daryao and Ors. v. State of U. P. and Ors. : [1962]1SCR574 , and Pandurang Dhoni Chougule v. Maputi Hari Jadhav : [1966]1SCR102 , learned Counsel for the appellant contended that the plea of res judicata is a plea of law which concerns the jurisdiction of Courts and the rule of constructive res judicata though technical, is founded on considerations of public policy and it is in the interests of the public at lerge that a finality should attach to the binding decisions pronounced by Courts of competent jurisdiction and individuals are not vexed twice over with the same kind of litigation and the appellant should be permitted to raise the plea of constructive ret judicata though it has not been raised in the Courts below. The appellant has also filed C.M.P. No 4653 of 1979 to permit him to raise the plea of constructive res judicata as an additional ground in appeal. As the plea regarding constructive res judicata relates to jurisdiction and goes to the root of the matter, the learned Counsel for the appellant was permitted to raise the plea before this Court.

5. The allegations made in E. A. No. 345 of 1971 in E. P. No. 46 of 1970 are such as to bring the petition both under Section 47 as well as Order 21, Rule 90, Civil Procedure Code. The allegation regarding sale without proper service of notice on first respondent attacks the very sale and an illegality of that kind will not amount to a mere irregularity in the publication or conduct of the sale so as to fall within the ambit of Order 21, Rule 90. It would being the case within the purview of Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. In the case reported in Natarajan v. Chandmull Amarchand by Power of Attorney, K. Milopchand and Anr. : (1971)1MLJ474 a Division Bench of this Court has pointed out that want of notice under Order 21, Rule 64 or 66 is a stage anterior to the publication of proclamation of sale or conducting the sale and such a petition would fall within the purview of Section 47, Civil Procedure Code and not under Order 21, Rule 90, Civil Procedure Code. In The official Receiver, Tirunelveli U.P.R.M. and Co., Tuticorin and Ors. : AIR1963Mad201 , this Court has held that if there are allegations which would bring the case both under Section 47 as well as Order 21, Rule 90, it will be open to demand security in so far as that part of the petition falling under Order 21 Rule 90, and it cannot demand security for that part of the petition falling under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. Learned Counsel for the appellant contend that the application in so far as it related to Order 21, Rule 90 can be dismissed for the first respondent's default in furnishing security and the Court should have proceeded with the application so far as it related to Section 47 and as the executing Court dismissed the application relating to Order 21, Rule 90 and Section 47 as well for default in furnishing adequate security and as the first respondent has allowed the matter to become final and conclusive without preferring an appeal, he will be debarred by the principle of constructive res judicata from raising that plea regarding lack of notice under Order 21, Rule 64 or 66.

6. The allegations made in E. A. No. 345 of 1971 in E. P. No. 46 of 1970 would bring the case both under Section 47 as well as Order 21, Rule 90, Civil Procedure Code. It is open to the executing Court to demand security only in respect of that part of the petition falling under Order 21, Rule 90 and not to that part of the petition falling under Section 47. So the order of dismissal of the executing Court for default in furnishing security can relate to the portion of the petition falling under Order 21, Rule 90, and not to the portion of the petition falling under Section 47. As the executing Court is not competent to demand security for a petition under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code., its order of dismissal can only pertain to the portion of the petition falling within the ambit of Section 47, Civil Procedure Code, the question of appeal or the first respondent's failure to file an appeal constituting, constructive res judicata can hardly arise. The plea of the appellant regarding constructive res judicata is accordingly negatived.

7. The Full Bench of this Court in Rajagopala Ayyar v. Ramanujachariar and Anr. I.L.R. (1924) Mad. 288 : (1924) 46 M.L.J. 124 : 16 L.W. 179 : A.I.R. 1924 Mad. 431, took the view that the sale held in execution without the issue of notice under Order 21, Rule 22(2), Civil Procedure Code is a nullity and not merely voidable and it can be set aside under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. In Neelu Nethiar v. Subramania Moothan (1920) 11 L.W.59 : A.I.R. 1920 Mad. 481,a Division Bench of this Court held that the ground of complaint relating to violation of Order 21, Rule 66 can only be considered under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. A Division Bench of this Court in Natarajan v. Chandmull Amarchand : (1971)1MLJ474 , held that Order 21, rule as, Civil Procedure Code, would apply only where the sale was sought to be set aside on the ground of material irregularity or fraud in publishing or conducting it and want of notice under Order 21, Rule 64 or 66 having a stage anterior to the publication of the proclamation of sale or conducting the sale, it would not fall under Order 21, Rule 93 and the application for setting aside the sale on that ground should be made under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. Reviewing these decisions a Full Bench of this Court, in an unreported Judgment dated 14th June, 1979 in C.M.A. Nos. 386 of 1975, 2 and 3 of 1976 held:

Though Section 47 is very wide in its terms and in one sense all questions relating to the execution, discharge or satisfaction of the decree that arise between the decree-holder and the judgment-debtor are within the purview of that section, it tought to be so interpreted as not to render nevertheless that section redundant the other provisions contained in the Code, particularly rules 89, 90 and 81 of Order 21, and as between the judgment-debtor and the decree-holder only such applications to set aside an auction-purchase made by the decree-holder as do not come within the purview of rules 89,90 and 81 of Order 21 are within the scope of Section 47 of the Code....

Thus, if the sale is sought to be set aside on the ground of material irregularity in publishing and conducting the sale within the meaning of Order 21, Rule 90, then Section 47 cannot come into play at all, and the sale could be set aside on the ground of material irregularity in publishing and conducting the sale within the meaning of Order 21, Rule 90; then Section 47 cannot come into play at all, and the sale could be set aside only by invoking Order 21, Rule 90. But if the sale is claimed to be void for certain illegality or voidable on ground of material irregularities not referred to in Order 21, Rule 90, then Section 47 has to be invoked and in such cases Order 21, Rule 90, Civil Procedure Code, cannot come into play at all.

From the judgment of the Full Bench cited supra it can be seen that if a sale is sought to be set aside on the ground of material irregularity in publishing and conducting the sale, or on the ground that there is defect or irregularity in the sale proclamation, the petition would fall within the purview of Order 21, Rule 90. But if the sale is claimed to be void for want of notice under Order 21, Rule 22 or 64 or 66, then Section 47 has to be invoked. In the present case, the first respondent has alleged that no notice of sale proceedings had been served on him. As the sale is claimed to be void for want of proper service of notice under Order 21, Rule 64 and 66, the present petition, E. A. No. 614 of 1971 falls under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. The fact that security was ordered to be furnished only strengthens the conclusion that the earlier petition, E. A No. 345 of 1971 of was treated as one falling under Order 21, Rule 90, Civil Procedure Code. The question of proper service of sale notice which is now the main ground for having the sale set aside under Section 47, could not have been a matter in issue between the petition in E. A. No. 345 of 1971. Whether the sale is a nullity for want of service of notice under Order 21, Rule 64 or 66 is foreign to the scope of enquiry under Order 21, Rule 90, Civil Procedure Code. That question can be considered only on an application filed under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. As the matter regarding want of service of notice under Order 21, rules 64 and 66 invalidating the sale was not a matter directly and substantially in issue between the parties in S.A. No. 345 of 1971, the question of res judicata or constructive res judicata operating as a bar for raising that issue in E. A. No. 614 of 1971 can hardly arise.

8. The next question to be considered is whether the Court auction sale is a nullity for want of proper service of sale notice to the first respondent. A Full Bench of this Court in Parasurama Odayar v. Appadurai Chetty and Ors. : AIR1970Mad271 , after reviewing the entire law on the subject held:

(1) the provision of Order 5, Civil Procedure Code, relating to the manner of service will apply even to the notice issued under Order 21, Rule 66, Civil Procedure Code.

(2) Where the return of the process-server under Order 5, Rule 17 has not already been verified by the affidavit of the serving officer, the Court shall examine the serving officer on oath or cause him to be so examined by another Court touching his proceedings. Where there is no affidavit of the serving officer and where the serving officer is not subsequently examined by the Court, there is non-compliance with the first part of Order 5, Rule 19, Civil Procedure Code, and the service is ineffective.

(3) There must be a declaration by the executing Court that the summons have been duly served as required by second part of Order 5, Rule 19. The endorsement of the Court should indicate that the Presiding Officer has applied his mind and considered that the summons has been duly served. The exact form of declaration may be in any convenient form such as 'defendant has been duly served', or 'it is declared that the service is sufficient', or simply 'defendant duly served' or 'service sufficient'

In the present case in the execution of decree in E. P. No. 46 of 1970, the first respondent has not been personally served with notice under Order 21, Rule 66, Civil Procedure Code. The endorsements in E. P. No. 46 of 1970 show that on 2nd May, 1970, sale notice was ordered to the first respondent returnable on 15th July, 1970, and that notice was returned as 'affixed' and fresh notices were ordered for 17th August, 1970, 25th September, 1970 and 13th November, 1970. On each of these occasions notices were returned as 'affixed' on the ground that the first respondent is away and not available for service of notice. In the last notice issued for the hearing on 30th November, 1970, the endorsement of the process-server on the notice is as under:

Learned counsel for the appellant laying emphasis on the words contended that the above endorsement of the process server on the reverse side of the notice should be construed as an affidavit within the meaning of Order 5, Rule 19, Civil Procedure Code, and the requirement of service of notice as laid down by the decision of the Full Bench referred to supra has been complied with in the present case. Learned Counsel for the respondent contended that the above endorsement is only a report of the serving officer required under Order 5, Rule 17, and not an affidavit as contemplated under Order 5 Rule 19, Order 5, Rule 17, Civil Procedure Code provides that when the defendant is absent from the residence and cannot be found by the serving officer to effect service of notice, then the serving officer shall affix a copy of the notice on the outer door or some other conspicuous part of the house in which the defendant ordinarily resides and return the original to the Court with a report endorsed thereon stating that he has so affixed the copy, the circumstances under which he did so, and the name and address of the person by whom the house was identified and in whose presence the copy was affixed. When summons is returned under Order 5, Rule 19 and if the return under that rule has not been verified by the affidavit of the serving officer, the Court may, if it has not been so verified, examine the serving officer on oath or cause him to be so examined by another Court touching his proceedings, and may make such further inquiry into the matter as it thinks fit (vide Order 5, Rule 19). [In the present case the passage extracted above in Tamil only indicates that it is only a report of the serving officer as contemplated under Order 5, Rule 17. There is no verification by the serving officer and the words written and initialled by the Nazir will not have the effect of the serving officer verifying the return by affidavit. Even granting that the process-server was affirmed by the Central Nazir while making the endorsement on the notice extracted above, it would only mean that the process server solemnly affirmed the fact stated in the return before the Nazir. The requirement under law is that besides the report of the serving officer as required under Order 5, Rule 17, there must have been an affidavit of the serving officer under Order 5, rule, 19. Since no affidavit was taken by the Nazir, it was incumbent on Court under the first part of Order 5, Rule 19 to examine the serving officer on oath. Since that was not done, there is no valid service of notice under Order 21, Rule 66. Adverting to this aspect, the Full Bench in Parasurama Odayar v. Appadurai Chetty and Ors. : AIR1970Mad271 , has observed:.where the return under Rule 17 has not been verified by the affidavit of the serving officer, the Court shall examine him on oath and it is mandatory. If there is an affidavit, it means that the serving officer has stated something on oath and, if the statement, turns out to be false he could be prosecuted. That itself would put him on guard and make him adhere to the truth as far as possible and would minimise the chances of a false return of service. It is with the same object that the Court is required to examine him on oath where he has not verified the return by an affidavit before the prescribed officer (Nazir). We know of numerous instances where defendants and judgment-debtors come to the Court and state that the process-server has not come to their place at all and that the alleged affixture is a myth, and there are several cases where such a contention of the defendant or judgment-debtor has been accepted by the Courts. Such a danger would be minimised if the Court adhere to the provisions of Order 3, Rule 19.

The passage extracted above only emphasises the need for strict compliance of Order 5, Rule 19. Since the law makes it obligatory on the part of the judgment-debtor to file an application for setting aside the sale within 39 days of the date of sale; where he has notice, actual or constructive, it is necessary that there should be strict compliance with the provisions of Order 5, Rule 19. As the decree-holder or auction-purchaser can invite the Court to hold that there was constructive notice under Order 21, Rule 66 to the judgment-debtor the provisions of Order 5, Rule 19 have to be strictly construed. In the present case as there is no affidavit of the serving officer and the serving officer is not subsequently examined by Court, there is non-compliance of the first part of Order 5, Rule 19, Civil Procedure Code, and the service of notice under Order 21, Rule 66 is ineffective and the sale held in pursuance of such an ineffective notice is a nullity. Relying on the decision of the Supreme Court in Ittyavira Mathai v. Varkey Varkey and Anr. : [1964]1SCR495 , and Dhirendera Nath Gorai v. Sudhir Chandra Ghosh and Ors. : [1964]6SCR1001 , Learned Counsel for the appellant contended that non-compliance of Order 5, Rule 19, Civil Procedure Code, will not make the sale a nullity, as long as the Court-auction sale was held by a Court having jurisdiction over the subject, matter. The requirement under Order 5, Rule 19, it is mandatory requirement and the sale held in contravention of that mandatory requirement is not a mere irregularity, but would have the effect of making the sale a nullity. As Order 5, Rule 19 is a mandatory provision conceived in public interest and as the sale was held in contravention of the mandatory provision, it will render the sale a nullity. As pointed out by a Full Beach decision of this Court in Rajagopala Ayyar v. Ramanujachariar (1924) 6 M.L.J. 104 : I.L.R. (1924) 47 Mad. 288, a sale held in execution of a decree without notice to the judgment-debtor is a nullity and not merely voidable but is void as against the person to whom notice should have been, but was not, issued. Hence the objection of the learned Counsel for the appellant that absence of proper notice under Order 21, Rule 66 to the first respondent is merely voidable and not void cannot be accepted.

9. Learned Counsel for the appellant contended that objection regarding absence of proper service of notice under Order 21, Rule 66 invalidating the sale was taken up for the first time only before the District Court and the objection was not even pleaded in the application filed by the first respondent to set aside the sale. In paragraph 11 in E. A. No. 614 of 1972 the first respondent has clearly stated that he has not been apprised of the various proceedings taken in the executing court. Absence of proper service of notice under Order 21, Rule 66 can be spelt out from the above allegation. Even otherwise, absence of proper notice under Order 21, Rule 66 invalidating a sale is a question of law which required no further investigation of facts and was understood and debated as such by the parties before the District Court. So the contention of the learned Counsel on this point is negatived.

10. Learned Counsel for the appellant contended that the application for setting aside the sale not having been filed within 30 days from the date of sale is barred by limitation under Article 127 of the Limitation Act. As there has been no strict compliance of the provisions of Order 5, Rule 19, Civil Procedure Code, by the executing court, the application to set aside the sale will be governed by the residuary Article 137 as laid down by this Court in the Full Bench decision reported in Parasuram Odayar v. Appadurai Chetty and Ors. : AIR1970Mad271 , As the present application for setting aside the sale has been filed within three years from the date of sale, it is not barred by Article 137. Learned Counsel for the appellant contended that no application for setting aside the sale can be entertained after the sale had been duly confirmed by the executing Court and after confirmation by the executing Court, the only plea available to the party is to contend that the judgment-debtor had no saleable interest in the property sold. In support of this contention, the learned Counsel for the appellant relied on Somasundaram v. Kondyya : AIR1926Mad12 , Pethaperumal Ambalam v. Chidambaram Chettiar : AIR1954Mad760 , Rajah Kocherlokota Venkata Jagannatha Rao Garu v. (Maharajah Ram) Venkata Kumara Mahipat Surya Rao Bahadur and Ors. , and Ramaswami Iyer v. Komalavalli Ammal : (1940)2MLJ1055 . In the case reported in Somasundaram v. Kondayya : AIR1926Mad12 , the plaintiff was a transferee from the auction-purchaser and his suit was to redeem a mortgage held by the defendant and subject to which the property was sold' at the auction, The defendant pleaded that the property being an inam land was in alienable, and therefore the sale conveyed not title to the auction purchaser. The Court held that the proper place to raise the objection to attachment in sale is the executing Court and the judgment-debtor who had not raised the objection at the executing Court could not afterwards question the validity of the sale in the suit instituted by the transferee from the auction-purchaser. The broad principle laid down by Courts in all the decisions cited by the learned Counsel for the appellant is to the effect that the proper place to raise objections to attachment in sale is the executing Court and if the judgment-debtor has failed to raise objections at that stage, it is not open to him to question the validity of the sale in a suit instituted by the auction-purchaser or his succes it sor-in-interest. From these decisions follows that the judgment-debtor will b permitted to impeach the sale only in the executing Court and if he had not raised any objection to the attachment and sale of property in that executing Court, he will be bound by the order of confirmation of sale and precluded from questioning the validity of the Court sale in any suit instituted by the auction-purchaser or his saccessor-in-interest. In the present case the first respondent is impeaching the validity of the sale before the executing Court in an application filed under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. The only place where he can question the validity of the sale is the executing Court and that is what precisely the first respondent has done by filing an application under Section 47, Civil Procedure Code. before the executing Court. The decisions cited by the learned Counsel for the appellant will have therefore, no application to the facts of the present case. In fact, a single Judge of this Court in the decision reported in Pandurangan and Anr. v. Dasu Reddy : (1972)2MLJ277 , has gone to the extent of holding that an application under Order 21, Rule 90 will lie even in cases where the sale had been confirmed and the sale certificate issued. In the circumstances, the objection by the learned Counsel that after the confirmation of the sale it is not open to the first respondent to question the validity of the sale lacks substance and is accordingly negatived.

11. The sale cannot be invalidated on the ground of simultaneous execution in view of The decision of the Supreme Court in Prem Lata Agarwal v. Lakshman Prasad Gupta and Ors. : [1971]1SCR364 , Relying on the decision of this Court reported in V. Rajagopal Naidu v. Smt. Muthulakshmi Ammal and Ors. (1968) 81 L.W. 190 : A.I.R. 1960 Mad. 5 the learned District Judge has held the sale to be invalid on the ground that the sale proclamation has failed to disclose the valuation of the judgment-debtor. If the judgment-debtor fails to apper and state his estimate of the value of the property at the execution proceedings, the value of the properties as stated by the judgment-debtor cannot be specified in the sale proclamation as required under Order 21, Rule 66(2). The order of the learned District Judge setting aside the sale on the ground that the Court has not specified in the sale proclamation the value of the property as per the estimate of the judgment-debtor cannot, therefore, be sustained. In view of the decision of this Court reported in Krishnaswami Goundar v. Palani Gounder (1975) 1 M.L.J. 114 : A.I.R. 1975 Mad. 1971. In the result, the order of the learned District Judge is confirmed hough on different grounds, and the appeal stands dismissed, with costs.


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