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Brammoye Dassee on Behalf of Brojo Nath Singh and anr. Vs. Kristo Mohun Mookerjee - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
SubjectCivil
CourtKolkata
Decided On
Judge
Reported in(1877)ILR2Cal222
AppellantBrammoye Dassee on Behalf of Brojo Nath Singh and anr.
RespondentKristo Mohun Mookerjee
Cases ReferredMohima Chunder Roy Chowdhry v. Ram Kishore Acharjee Chowdhry
Excerpt:
res judicata - act viii of 1859, sections 2 & 170--hindu widow--reversioner. - .....does not seem to be material. after the death of the widow, the heir of her husband brought the present suit for possession. the decree in the former suit was set up as a bar to the present suit; and an issue was raised whether or no that decree was a bar to the present suit.3. the munsif, who tried the suit, seemed to have had some doubt whether, in point of law, the former decree was a bar to this suit. he also hold that there was no proper trial upon the issues raised in the former suit. he then went on to say that the plaintiff, in the present suit, had relied mainly upon the evidence of the defendant; and, inasmuch as the defendant having been summoned, did not choose to appear in court, he gave the plaintiff a decree under section 170 of the civil procedure code.4. the district.....
Judgment:

Markby, J.

1. In this casts we think the judgment of the first Court was a right judgment, and ought not to have been disturbed by the lower Appellate Court.

2. It appears that there were three brothers entitled to a certain property. A decree had been obtained against two of the brothers, Shib Prosad and Bhola Nath. Their rights and interests in the property were sold, and the defendant got into possession. The widow of one of the brothers then brought a suit for declaration of her title to one-third share of the property. An issue was raised whether that share was the right and interest of the plaintiff as alleged by her, or of Shib Prosad and Bhola Nath as alleged by the defendant. There wore other parties to that suit, but that does not seem to be material. After the death of the widow, the heir of her husband brought the present suit for possession. The decree in the former suit was set up as a bar to the present suit; and an issue was raised whether or no that decree was a bar to the present suit.

3. The Munsif, who tried the suit, seemed to have had some doubt whether, in point of law, the former decree was a bar to this suit. He also hold that there was no proper trial upon the issues raised in the former suit. He then went on to say that the plaintiff, in the present suit, had relied mainly upon the evidence of the defendant; and, inasmuch as the defendant having been summoned, did not choose to appear in Court, he gave the plaintiff a decree under Section 170 of the Civil Procedure Code.

4. The District Judge entirely concurs with the Munsif in thinking that this is a proper case to be dealt with under that section; but thinks that section could not be applied to the present case, because in this case the plaintiff cannot show a legal right. What he means by that apparently is that the legal right which the plaintiff sets up in this case is wholly barred by the decision in the former suit. But the District Judge seems to have overlooked this,--that there was in the present case not an absolute bar such as there would have been, if this were the case of a decree against the person through whom the plaintiff claims. The rule that a decree against the widow binds the reversioner is subject to this qualification, that there has been a fair trial of the right in the former suit. That is laid down in what is commonly called the Shivagunga case 9 Moore's I.A. 539 and in the decision of this Court to the same effect, with which I entirely concur, in the case of Mohima Chunder Roy Chowdhry v. Ram Kishore Acharjee Chowdhry 15 B.L.R 142; vide p. 159. It was there pointed out that the Privy Council, in a more recent case Nogender chunder Ghoss v, Sreemutty Kaminee Dossee 11 Moore's I.A. 241 have said that, while they adhere to the rule that the widow represents the estate of the reversioner for some purposes, it is her duty not only to represent the estate, but to protect it also.

5. Now, in this case, it is obvious that there were some grounds for looking closely to see what really took place in the former suit, because we find that the former suit was disposed of in a manner which, on the face of it, seems to be not satisfactory.

6. The plaintiff in that suit, after having brought her suit, and after having partially examined one witness, declined to examine any of her other witnesses. She had also cited the defendant, the same person who was cited to appear in this case. It does not, however, appear whether she made any real attempt to get the defendant into Court, or whether the summons was served upon him. Anyhow he never came into Court, therefore there was good ground for inquiring whether there was a fair trial of the question between the parties in the former suit, and whether the plaintiff performed her duty in protecting, not only her own interest, but the interests of the person who was to take after her death.

7. Upon that question the evidence of the defendant is most important. Therefore the Court has a perfect right to say that the decree in the former is not a bar to this suit, until there had been some inquiry as to how it was obtained. And the defendant refusing to come in to give his evidence upon that point, the Court would be justified in dealing with the case under Section 170 of Act VIII of 1859. We may assume for the purposes of this judgment that the decree in the former suit would have been a bar to the present suit, if it had been properly obtained; but that would not in any way prevent the Court from inquiring into the question whether it was so or not. Having regard to the circumstances which I have mentioned, the Munsif was right in dealing with the case under Section 170. We think, therefore, that the judgment of the first Court was right and ought to be restored, and that of the lower Appellate Court reversed. The plaintiff will get the costs in this Court and in the lower Appellate Court.


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