Skip to content


Krishna Kumar Ghose Vs. Makhanlal Banerjee and ors. - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
CourtKolkata
Decided On
Judge
Reported in63Ind.Cas.11
AppellantKrishna Kumar Ghose
RespondentMakhanlal Banerjee and ors.
Cases ReferredRamjash Agarwala v. Guru Charan Sen
Excerpt:
civil procedure cod (act v of 1908,), section 78 - execution of decree--application in two courts--assets realised by superior court--rateable distribution--prior attachment, effect of. - .....rateable distribution aid that the only defeat was that the application was not in the firm of an application for execution of decree. but no application for execution was made to that court, and we are unable to hold that the petitioners are entitled to rateabla distribution in respect of both the decrees.7. the result is that the order of the court below will be modified, and the petitioners will be entitled to rateable distribution only in respect of the decree under which the goods were attached prior to the attachment effected at the instance of the opposite parties. bat in making the rateabla distribution, any amount paid by the opposite parties as freight and demurrage charges will be first distributed from the assets realisad and paid to bear opposite parties and the balance.....
Judgment:

1. The petitioners in this Rule obtained two decrees for money in the Calcutta Small Cause Court against the judgment-debtors. They attached before judgment certain goods belonging to the judgment-debtors in the custody of certain navigation companies. Applications for execution of the decrees were made in the Naraingunj Munsif's Court for realising Rs. 1,449 and odd due under the two decrees, and sale proclamation was issued fixing the 7th October 1920 for the sale of the goods the Opposite parties bad also obtained a decree against the same judgment-debtors in the Calcutta Small Cause Court, and had attached the goods before judgment. Their attachment was prior to the attachment tinder one of the decrees obtained by the petitioners, but subsequent to the attachment under their other decree.

2. The opposite parties executed their decree in the Dacca Sub Judge's Court and got the sale fixed for the 7th October in the Munsif's Court (in execution of the petitioners' decrees) Stayed. The petitioners thereupon asked the Subordinate Judge to direct the Munsif to held the sale and send the assets which might be realised to the Dacca Court for reteable distribution. The application was refused and the Dacca Court issued proclamation for sale fixing the 23rd November for sale, which was postponed to the 6th December. On the 22nd November the petitioners submitted a petition to the Subordinate Judge of Dacca, in which they stated that under the low that Court had the power to execute decrees and determine claims, etc., in connection therewith, that the goods had been attached under Section 63 of the Code and that the petitioners were entitled to reteable distribution out of the assets. They prayed that the execution cases pending in the Naraingung Munsif's Court might be transferred to Dacca and that the assets which would be realised by the sale of the goods which had been first attached by them, might be retably distributed between them and the opposite parties. The Subordinate Judge thereupon made an order that 'on the sale of the moveables ordered in this case let the records of the execution cases be called for reteable distribution as prayed for.' The sale took place in the Dacca Court on the 8th and the Subordinate Judge by his order, dated the 11th December disallowed the prayer of the petitioners for reteable distribution.

3. The Subordinate Judge relied upon with case of Ramjash Agarwala v. Guru Charan Sen 3 Ind. Cas. 105 : 11 C.L.J. 69 : 14 C.W.N. 396 in holding that the petitioners were not entitled to reteable distribution as no application was made by them for execution in the Subordinate Judge's Court, Dacca, which realised the assets as laid down in Section 73 of the Civil Procedure Code.

4. The petitioner rely upon the case of Clark v. Alexander 21 C. 200 : 10 Ind. Dec. (N.S.) 766 and some other cases in support of the contention that the superior Court can, under Section 285 (Section 63 of the present Cold), deal with the question of reteable distribution although no application had been made under Section 2(sic)5 (Section 73 of the present Code). The case Clark v. Alexander 21 C. 200 : 10 Ind. Dec. (N.S.) 766 and the other cases on the point were discussed in Ramjash Agarwala v. Guru Charsan Sen 3 Ind. Cas. 105 : 11 C.L.J. 69 : 14 C.W.N. 396, and the learned Judge observed that they could not agree with the dicision in that case if it was intended tohold that a creditor who was cot entitled, to rateable distribution under Section 295 because he did not apply for execution to the Court which held the assets realised, or because such application had not, been made prior to the realisation of the assets, was yet entitled to the same benefit under Section 283. The case of Bhugwan Chunder v. Chundra Mal Mala Gupta 29 C. 77 : 1 C.L.J. 97 : 6 C.W.N. (sic), would seem to support the view taken in the case of Clark v. Alexander 21 C. 200 : 10 Ind. Dec. (N.S.) 766, On the other hand the view taken in the case of Ramjash Agarwala v. Guru Charan Sen 3 Ind. Cas. 105 : 11 C.L.J. 69 : 14 C.W.N. 896, is supported by some of the decisions cited in that case. In the case of Ramjas Agarwala v. Guru Charai Sin 3 Ind. Cas. 105 : 11 C.L.J. 69 : 14 C.W.N. 896, the learned Judges referred to a decision of the Burma Court, in which the case of Clark v. Alexander 21 C. 200 : 10 Ind. Dec. (N.S.) 766, was distinguished, on the ground that the attachment in the inferior Court had been made before the attachment by the superior Court and it was suggested that in such a case, the question might perhaps be treated as one for determination of an objection (by the creditor who had obtained the earlier attachment in the inferior Court) as to the money deposited in Court or for the determination of a claim thereto, Mr. Justice Ashton of the Burma Court put forward the following line ofreasoning in support of his suggestion: as 'an execution creation who has first got the property attached is not to get leas than a rateable share of the assets merely because his execution proceedings are not taken in the Court which actually realise the assets and he accordingly makes no application under Section 295 before realisation in the Utter Court, the Court holding the assets may without transferring the prior attaching decree-holder's dearest itself for execution and without any application being made before the realisation of the assets, give recognition to the above ex Sent of the claim of the prior attaching creditor as a claim contemplated by, one or other of the sections preceding Section 285, such for instance as Sections 279, 280 or 282, by deciding under Section 285 to realise and bold for the satisfaction of the prior attaching creditor's decree, on the proper steps being takes for it to be to executed, a rateable share of the assets already realised.' Toe learned Judges in the case of Ramjash Agarwala v. Guru Charan Sen 29 C. 77 : 1 C.L.J. 97 : 6 C.W.N. (sic), after quoting the above passage observed: 'But we need not express any opinion upon the question whether the decision in Clark v. Alexander 21 C. 200 : 10 Ind. Dec. (N.S.) 766, may or may not be justices on the grounds suggested, nor need we discuss whether that decision may not require re consideration, when another case pracisely similar to it on the facts arises, In the present... case the attaching creditor in the inferior Execution Court obtained his attachment long after the attaching creditor in the superior Court has obtained his attachment. This ground along is sufficient to differentiate the case before us from the decision in Clark v. Alexander 21 C. 200 : 10 Ind. Dec. (N.S.) 766. The question is not free from difficulty, but so far as one of the decrees of the petitioners is concerned, viz., that in which there was a prior attachment by the petitioners, we think, was may adopt the reasoning of Mr. Justice Ashton quoted above, and hold that they are entitled to rateable distribution. With respect loathe other decree, in which the attachment was sub-sequent to that effected at the instance of the opposite parties, we think having regard to the present state of the authorities, that we should follow the decision in the case of Ramjash Agarwala v. Guru Charan Sen 29 C. 77 : 1 C.L.J. 97 : 6 C.W.N. (sic), which appears to be the latest decision on the point.

6. It is contended that application had been made to the Subordinate Judge, Dacca, by the petitioners for the transfer of the execution cases from the Munsifs Court and for rateable distribution aid that the only defeat was that the application was not in the firm of an application for execution of decree. But no application for execution was made to that Court, and we are unable to hold that the petitioners are entitled to rateabla distribution in respect of both the decrees.

7. The result is that the order of the Court below will be modified, and the petitioners will be entitled to rateable distribution only in respect of the decree under which the goods were attached prior to the attachment effected at the instance of the opposite parties. Bat in making the rateabla distribution, any amount paid by the opposite parties as freight and demurrage charges will be first distributed from the assets realisad and paid to bear opposite parties and the balance rateably distributed as directed above. Each party to bear its own costs in both Courts. Let the records be sent down without delay.


Save Judgments// Add Notes // Store Search Result sets // Organizer Client Files //