Skip to content


Jnanendra Kumar Ray Chaudhuri Vs. Amrita Krishna Datta - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
CourtKolkata
Decided On
Judge
Reported in147Ind.Cas.797
AppellantJnanendra Kumar Ray Chaudhuri
RespondentAmrita Krishna Datta
Cases ReferredKhetter Monun Singh v. Kassy Nath Sett
Excerpt:
limitation act (ix of 1908), schedule i, article 166 - filing of notice of motion within limitation--application, if can be held to be in time--application to set aside sale--purchaser having actual notice--absence of formal notice--whether material. - .....in the light of the english decisions.3. in hinga bibee v. munna bibee 31 c. 150 : 8 c.w.n 97, sale, j., held that the service of a notice that an application would be made to restore a suit does not prevent limitation from running. in that case also the english cases were not brought to the attention of the learned judge, and he decided that the notice of motion was not sufficient to prevent the law of limitation from applying, as was laid down in the case of khetler mohun singh v. kassy nath sett 20 c. 899. in fact, as i have already remarked, the decision in that case turned upon the the question whether the issue of a summons prevented time from running, and therefore is distinguishable. in venkapaiyav. nazerally tyabally 86 ind. cas. 440 : a.i.r. 1924 bom. 36.47 b 764, which was.....
Judgment:
ORDER

Williams, J.

1. In this suit a sale was held by by the .Registrar on February 10, 1933. On March 13, the defendant Amritakrishna Datta gave notice that, on Monday March 20, an application would be made for an order that the sale be set aside. Article 166, Limitation Act, provides that such an application must be made within thirty days of the sale. The thirtieth day fell on March 12, which was a Sunday. Therefore the applicant had, until March 13 inclusive, to make his application. The first point taken by the plaintiff is that there were two purchasers at the sale, and that notice was given to one only. I am satisfied from the affidavits that the other purchaser had actual notice of the application and that absence of formal notice is not a bar. This was decided by Suhrawardy and Duval, JJ., in the case of Charu Chandra Ghosh v. Behari Lal Mitra : AIR1925Cal157 .

2. The next point taken by the plaintiff is more difficult to determine. It is clear that notice of the application was served on March 13, but it is argued on his behalf that this is not sufficient, and that the serving of the notice is not the 'application' which must be made within the thirty days. In Khettar Mohun Singh v. Kassy Nath Sett 20 C. 899, it was held, that the taking of a summons calling upon another to attend a Judge in chambers on the hearing of an application is the act of the applicant, and not of the court taking cognizance of the application, and is not sufficient to save the application from being barred, if the hearing of the application comes on after the time allowed by the Limitation Act for the application has expired. That is a decision of the court sitting in appeal from the original side and is binding upon me. But it appears from the report that none of the English cases were cited to the learned Judges. In my opinion, the point decided requires further consideration by the court sitting in appeal in the light of the English decisions.

3. In Hinga Bibee v. Munna Bibee 31 C. 150 : 8 C.W.N 97, Sale, J., held that the service of a notice that an application would be made to restore a suit does not prevent limitation from running. In that case also the English cases were not brought to the attention of the learned Judge, and he decided that the notice of motion was not sufficient to prevent the law of limitation from applying, as was laid down in the case of Khetler Mohun Singh v. Kassy Nath Sett 20 C. 899. In fact, as I have already remarked, the decision in that case turned upon the the question whether the issue of a summons prevented time from running, and therefore is distinguishable. In Venkapaiyav. Nazerally Tyabally 86 Ind. Cas. 440 : A.I.R. 1924 Bom. 36.47 B 764, which was a decision on appeal, it was held that, where an application is to be made to the court within a limit of time, it is deemed to be made for the purposes of limitation when the notice of motion is first filed in the proper office of, the court.

4. The learned Judge relied upon In re Gallop and Central Queensland' Meat Export Co. (1890) 25QBD 230 : 59 L J Q B .460 : 33 W R 621 : 61 L.T 834. That was a decision of Denman, J., in which he held that the period of limitation ceased to run from the time when a notice of motion was served upon the other side, applying the ratio decidendi of Smith v. Parkside Mining Co. (1880) 6 Q B D 67 : 50 L J Q B 141 and In re Corporation of Huddersfield and Jacomb (1874) 17 Eq. 476. In Atarmoni Dassl v. Bepin Behari : AIR1929Cal193 Costello, J., held that the filing of a tabular statement is an application to the court and distinguishable from a notice of motion so far as it affects the question of limitation. The learned Judge reviewed the cases to which I have referred, and agreed with the Bombay decision, and the English cases upon which that decision was founded, but remarked that if he had been concerned with a notice of motion he would have felt himself bound by the decision in Khettar Mohun Singh v. Kassy Nath Sett 20 C. 899 to hold that the mere giving of a notice of motion is not sufficient to prevent the. period of limitation from running, but he ventured to express the opinion that the decision did not seem to be in accordance with the English cases. In my opinion, the law is correctly stated by Denman, J., and as the present case turns upon the question whether the service of a notice of motion is sufficient, it is distinguishable from the decision in Khetter Monun Singh v. Kassy Nath Sett 20 C. 899. Consequently I hold that the present application is not barred. Upon the merits, there is no ground for setting aside the sale. Therefore the application is dismissed with costs.


Save Judgments// Add Notes // Store Search Result sets // Organizer Client Files //