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De Forest Radio Company Vs. General Electric Company - Court Judgment

LegalCrystal Citation
CourtUS Supreme Court
Decided On
Case Number284 U.S. 571
AppellantDe Forest Radio Company
RespondentGeneral Electric Company
Excerpt:
de forest radio company v. general electric company - 284 u.s. 571 (1931) u.s. supreme court de forest radio company v. general electric company, 284 u.s. 571 (1931) 284 u.s. 571 de forest radio company, petitioner, v. general electric company. no. 630. supreme court of the united states october term, 1930 october 19, 1931 messrs. samuel e. darby, jr., of new york city, and thomas g. haight, of jersey city, n. j., for petitioner. mr. ralph b. evans, of philadelphia, pa., for respondent. ordered, that the opinion in this case be amended as follows: (1) by substituting for the words 'in july, 1912,' in the 12th line of the last paragraph of the opinion, the following: 'august 20, 1912, the earliest date claimed for.....
Judgment:
DE FOREST RADIO COMPANY v. GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY - 284 U.S. 571 (1931)
U.S. Supreme Court DE FOREST RADIO COMPANY v. GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, 284 U.S. 571 (1931)

284 U.S. 571

DE FOREST RADIO COMPANY, petitioner,
v.
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY.
No. 630.

Supreme Court of the United States

October term, 1930

October 19, 1931

Messrs. Samuel E. Darby, Jr., of New York City, and Thomas G. Haight, of Jersey City, N. J., for petitioner.

Mr. Ralph B. Evans, of Philadelphia, Pa., for respondent.

Ordered, that the opinion in this case be amended as follows:

(1) By substituting for the words 'In July, 1912,' in the 12th line of the last paragraph of the opinion, the following:

    'August 20, 1912, the earliest date claimed for Langmuir, was rejected, rightly, we think, by the District Court, which held that Langmuir was anticipated by Arnold in November, 1912. But before the earlier date,'

(2) By substituting for the 3d sentence from the end of the following:

    'By August, 1912, the Telegraph Company used De Forest amplifying audions at 54 volts, and, by November, they were used by another at 67 1/2 volts. This was possible only because the tubes had thus been exhausted of gas which would otherwise have ionized with blue glow at from 20 to 30 volts.'[ De Forest Radio Company v. General Electric Company 284 U.S. 571 (1931) ]



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